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Review

Conducting Population Health Research during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts and Recommendations

by 1,2,3,*, 1,3,4, 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,4,5
1
Centre for Oral Health Outcomes and Research Translation (COHORT), Western Sydney University, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia
2
South Western Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia
3
Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia
4
Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
5
Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC 3552, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Haywantee Ramkissoon
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3320; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063320
Received: 15 February 2021 / Revised: 7 March 2021 / Accepted: 15 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in many changes, including restrictions on indoor gatherings and visitation to residential aged care facilities, hospitals and certain communities. Coupled with potential restrictions imposed by health services and academic institutions, these changes may significantly impact the conduct of population health research. However, the continuance of population health research is beneficial for the provision of health services and sometimes imperative. This paper discusses the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on the conduct of population health research. This discussion unveils important ethical considerations, as well as potential impacts on recruitment methods, face-to-face data collection, data quality and validity. In addition, this paper explores potential recruitment and data collection methods that could replace face-to-face methods. The discussion is accompanied by reflections on the challenges experienced by the authors in their own research at an oral health service during the COVID-19 pandemic and alternative methods that were utilised in place of face-to-face methods. This paper concludes that, although COVID-19 presents challenges to the conduct of population health research, there is a range of alternative methods to face-to-face recruitment and data collection. These alternative methods should be considered in light of project aims to ensure data quality is not compromised. View Full-Text
Keywords: population health research; public health research; COVID-19; research methods population health research; public health research; COVID-19; research methods
MDPI and ACS Style

Villarosa, A.R.; Ramjan, L.M.; Maneze, D.; George, A. Conducting Population Health Research during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts and Recommendations. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3320. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063320

AMA Style

Villarosa AR, Ramjan LM, Maneze D, George A. Conducting Population Health Research during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts and Recommendations. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3320. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063320

Chicago/Turabian Style

Villarosa, Amy R., Lucie M. Ramjan, Della Maneze, and Ajesh George. 2021. "Conducting Population Health Research during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts and Recommendations" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3320. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13063320

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