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Article

HRV in Active-Duty Special Forces and Public Order Military Personnel

1
1st “Tuscania” Paratrooper Regiment Carabinieri, Italian Ministry of Defense, 57127 Livorno, Italy
2
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy
3
Warrant Officer and Brigadier Training School, Carabinieri Italian Ministry of Defense, 50127 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Santos Villafaina
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3867; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13073867
Received: 29 January 2021 / Revised: 6 March 2021 / Accepted: 29 March 2021 / Published: 31 March 2021
Heart rate variability (HRV) is a simple, non-invasive, real-time analyzable, and highly reproducible measurement that captures incidences for assessing a person’s health and physical condition. Public security jobs are characterized by major exposure to risk factors known to influence the cardiovascular response to stimuli, e.g., night shifts, highly physically demanding activity, and acute stress activity. This study aimed to evaluate the HRV parameters in a population of 112 male personnel of the special forces and public order of the Carabinieri, aged 25–59, when engaged in several duty tasks, such as paratroopers, night shift police station officers, night shift patrol, dynamic precision shooting evaluative team, dynamic precision shooting non-evaluative team, and office clerks (used as control group). During the specific task of each participant, the HRV parameters were collected with wearable devices and processed. The HRV parameters in the time and frequency domains collected were average heart rate, standard deviation of all normal RR intervals, root mean square of successive differences in adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals, very-low-frequency power, low-frequency power, high-frequency power, stress index, parasympathetic nervous system activity index, and sympathetic nervous system activity index. Parametric tests for independent series to compare the HRV parameters by subgroups within the study subjects were used. A multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the HRV parameters and some personal and organizational factors. The comparison between different subgroups showed that activities with a high demand for concentration and precision, as is the case with paratroopers and dynamic precision shooters, differ significantly from activities that can be defined as routine, such as office work. Other activities, such as patrolling or remote management from operations centers, although including critical elements, did not deviate significantly from the control group. The study of HRV parameters is therefore a useful tool for occupational physicians, both for addressing work suitability assessments and for better targeting health promotion campaigns, to be considered as being aimed at monitoring the subject’s physiological parameters, and not at the diagnosis of any pathological condition, which should always be carried out by the medical specialist. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational medicine; public health and safety; special forces personnel; heart rate variability (HRV); paratroopers; health biomarker; high fidelity data acquisition; biosensors occupational medicine; public health and safety; special forces personnel; heart rate variability (HRV); paratroopers; health biomarker; high fidelity data acquisition; biosensors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gancitano, G.; Baldassarre, A.; Lecca, L.I.; Mucci, N.; Petranelli, M.; Nicolia, M.; Brancazio, A.; Tessarolo, A.; Arcangeli, G. HRV in Active-Duty Special Forces and Public Order Military Personnel. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3867. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13073867

AMA Style

Gancitano G, Baldassarre A, Lecca LI, Mucci N, Petranelli M, Nicolia M, Brancazio A, Tessarolo A, Arcangeli G. HRV in Active-Duty Special Forces and Public Order Military Personnel. Sustainability. 2021; 13(7):3867. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13073867

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gancitano, Giuseppe, Antonio Baldassarre, Luigi I. Lecca, Nicola Mucci, Marco Petranelli, Mario Nicolia, Antonio Brancazio, Andrea Tessarolo, and Giulio Arcangeli. 2021. "HRV in Active-Duty Special Forces and Public Order Military Personnel" Sustainability 13, no. 7: 3867. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13073867

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