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Article

Revealing Kunming’s (China) Historical Urban Planning Policies Through Local Climate Zones

1
Department of Environment, Laboratory of Forest Management and Spatial Information Techniques, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Department of Geography, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
3
Department of Environment, Laboratory of Hydrology and Water Management, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
4
School of Ecology and Environmental Science, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(14), 1731; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11141731
Received: 24 June 2019 / Revised: 15 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 July 2019 / Published: 22 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing in Urban Climatology)
Over the last decade, Kunming has been subject to a strong urbanisation driven by rapid economic growth and socio-economic, topographical and proximity factors. As this urbanisation is expected to continue in the future, it is important to understand its environmental impacts and the role that spatial planning strategies and urbanisation regulations can play herein. This is addressed by (1) quantifying the cities’ expansion and intra-urban restructuring using Local Climate Zones (LCZs) for three periods in time (2005, 2011 and 2017) based on the World Urban Database and Access Portal Tool (WUDAPT) protocol, and (2) cross-referencing observed land-use and land-cover changes with existing planning regulations. The results of the surveys on urban development show that, between 2005 and 2011, the city showed spatial expansion, whereas between 2011 and 2017, densification mainly occurred within the existing urban extent. Between 2005 and 2017, the fraction of open LCZs increased, with the largest increase taking place between 2011 and 2017. The largest decrease was seen for low the plants (LCZ D) and agricultural greenhouse (LCZ H) categories. As the potential of LCZs as, for example, a heat stress assessment tool has been shown elsewhere, understanding the relation between policy strategies and LCZ changes is important to take rational urban planning strategies toward sustainable city development. View Full-Text
Keywords: urbanisation; Local Climate Zones; land-use/land-cover changes; Kunming; urban planning; policy; WUDAPT urbanisation; Local Climate Zones; land-use/land-cover changes; Kunming; urban planning; policy; WUDAPT
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vandamme, S.; Demuzere, M.; Verdonck, M.-L.; Zhang, Z.; Van Coillie, F. Revealing Kunming’s (China) Historical Urban Planning Policies Through Local Climate Zones. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 1731. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11141731

AMA Style

Vandamme S, Demuzere M, Verdonck M-L, Zhang Z, Van Coillie F. Revealing Kunming’s (China) Historical Urban Planning Policies Through Local Climate Zones. Remote Sensing. 2019; 11(14):1731. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11141731

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vandamme, Stéphanie, Matthias Demuzere, Marie-Leen Verdonck, Zhiming Zhang, and Frieke Van Coillie. 2019. "Revealing Kunming’s (China) Historical Urban Planning Policies Through Local Climate Zones" Remote Sensing 11, no. 14: 1731. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11141731

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