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Article

Global Sensitivity Analysis of the SCOPE Model in Sentinel-3 Bands: Thermal Domain Focus

Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
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Remote Sens. 2019, 11(20), 2424; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11202424
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 14 October 2019 / Published: 18 October 2019
Sentinel-3 satellite has provided simultaneous observations in the optical (visible, near infrared (NIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR)) and thermal infrared (TIR) domains since 2016, with a revisit time of 1–2 days. The high temporal resolution and spectral coverage make the data of this mission attractive for vegetation monitoring. This study explores the possibilities of using the Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes (SCOPE) model together with Sentinel-3 to exploit the two sensors onboard of Sentinel-3 (the ocean and land color instrument (OLCI) and sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR)) in synergy. Sobol’ variance based global sensitivity analysis (GSA) of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance produced with a coupled SCOPE-6S model was conducted for optical bands of OLCI and SLSTR, while another GSA of SCOPE was conducted for the land surface temperature (LST) product of SLSTR. The results show that in addition to ESA level-2 Sentinel-3 products, SCOPE is able to retrieve leaf area index (LAI), leaf chlorophyll content (Cab), leaf water content (Cw), leaf senescent material (Cs), leaf inclination distribution (LAD). Leaf dry matter content (Cdm) and soil brightness, despite being important, were not confidently retrieved in some cases. GSA of LST in TIR domain showed that plant biochemical parameters—maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and stomata conductance-photosynthesis slope (Ball-Berry m)—can be constrained if prior information on near-surface weather conditions is available. We conclude that the combination of optical and thermal domains facilitates the constraint of the land surface energy balance using SCOPE. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sentinel-3; OLCI; SLSTR; SCOPE model; global sensitivity analysis; top of atmosphere; TOA; thermal infrared domain; TIR; land surface temperature; LST; brightness temperature; BT Sentinel-3; OLCI; SLSTR; SCOPE model; global sensitivity analysis; top of atmosphere; TOA; thermal infrared domain; TIR; land surface temperature; LST; brightness temperature; BT
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prikaziuk, E.; van der Tol, C. Global Sensitivity Analysis of the SCOPE Model in Sentinel-3 Bands: Thermal Domain Focus. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 2424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11202424

AMA Style

Prikaziuk E, van der Tol C. Global Sensitivity Analysis of the SCOPE Model in Sentinel-3 Bands: Thermal Domain Focus. Remote Sensing. 2019; 11(20):2424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11202424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Prikaziuk, Egor, and Christiaan van der Tol. 2019. "Global Sensitivity Analysis of the SCOPE Model in Sentinel-3 Bands: Thermal Domain Focus" Remote Sensing 11, no. 20: 2424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs11202424

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