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Ocean–Atmosphere Interactions during Hurricanes Marco and Laura (2020)

1
School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
2
Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, MS 39529, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Meer Mohammed Ali and Mark Bourassa
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(10), 1932; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13101932
Received: 17 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 12 May 2021 / Published: 15 May 2021
During August of the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season, the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) was affected by two subsequent storms, Hurricanes Marco and Laura. Hurricane Marco entered the GoM first (22 August) and was briefly promoted to a Category 1 storm. Hurricane Laura followed Marco closely (25 August) and attained Category 4 status after a period of rapid intensification. Typically, hurricanes do not form this close together; this study aims to explain the existence of both hurricanes through the analysis of air-sea fluxes, local thermodynamics, and upper-level circulation. The GoM and its quality of warm, high ocean heat content waters proved to be a resilient and powerful reservoir of heat and moisture fuel for both hurricanes; however, an area of lower ocean heat content due to circulation dynamics was crucial in the evolution of both Marco and Laura. An analysis of wind shear further explained the evolution of both hurricanes. Furthermore, a suite of satellite observations and ocean model outputs were used to evaluate the biophysical modulations in the GoM. The cold core eddy (CCE) and Mississippi River surface plume had the greatest biophysical oceanic responses; the oceanic modulations were initialized by Marco and extended temporally and spatially by Laura. Reduced sea surface temperatures (SST), changes in sea surface salinity (SSS), and changes in Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentrations are related to translation speeds, and respective contributions of hurricane winds and precipitation are evaluated in this work. View Full-Text
Keywords: Hurricane Laura (2020); Hurricane Marco (2020); Gulf of Mexico; eddies; salinity; SMAP Hurricane Laura (2020); Hurricane Marco (2020); Gulf of Mexico; eddies; salinity; SMAP
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MDPI and ACS Style

Eley, E.N.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Trott, C.B. Ocean–Atmosphere Interactions during Hurricanes Marco and Laura (2020). Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 1932. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13101932

AMA Style

Eley EN, Subrahmanyam B, Trott CB. Ocean–Atmosphere Interactions during Hurricanes Marco and Laura (2020). Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(10):1932. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13101932

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eley, Emily N., Bulusu Subrahmanyam, and Corinne B. Trott. 2021. "Ocean–Atmosphere Interactions during Hurricanes Marco and Laura (2020)" Remote Sensing 13, no. 10: 1932. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rs13101932

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