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Article

Perceived Stress Can Mediate the Associations between a Lifestyle Intervention and Fat and Fast Food Intakes

1
College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705, USA
3
Department Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 October 2020 / Revised: 14 November 2020 / Accepted: 20 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients, Metabolism and Obesity Prevention)
This secondary analysis study addressed a gap of knowledge: whether perceived stress reduction created by a lifestyle intervention might serve as a mediator for reducing fat and fast food intakes in low-income overweight or obese mothers of young children. This analysis included 338 low-income overweight or obese mothers of young children who completed a phone interview immediately after the 16-week lifestyle intervention. Valid surveys were used to assess perceived stress and fat and fast food intakes. Composite indicator structural equation modeling was performed to test the mediation effects. The overall effect of the intervention was not significant for fat intake but was significant for fast food intake (B = −0.53, p < 0.05). When assessing the potential role of perceived stress as a mediator, the indirect effects of the intervention on fat (B = −0.39, p < 0.01) and fast food (B = −0.27, p < 0.01) intakes were both significant. Future dietary intervention studies aimed to reduce fat and fast food intakes in low-income overweight or obese mothers of young children might consider including practical strategies aimed at reducing perceived stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: stress; low-income women; fat intake; fast food intake; obesity stress; low-income women; fat intake; fast food intake; obesity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chang, M.-W.; Brown, R.; Wegener, D.T. Perceived Stress Can Mediate the Associations between a Lifestyle Intervention and Fat and Fast Food Intakes. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123606

AMA Style

Chang M-W, Brown R, Wegener DT. Perceived Stress Can Mediate the Associations between a Lifestyle Intervention and Fat and Fast Food Intakes. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123606

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chang, Mei-Wei, Roger Brown, and Duane T. Wegener 2020. "Perceived Stress Can Mediate the Associations between a Lifestyle Intervention and Fat and Fast Food Intakes" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3606. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12123606

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