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Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibition Does Not Favorably Modify the Physiological Responses to Dietary Counselling in Diabetes-Free, Sedentary Overweight and Obese Adult Humans

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
3
Medical Center of the Rockies Foundation, University of Colorado Health, Loveland, CO 80538, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 13 February 2020 / Published: 18 February 2020
Sedentary obesity is associated with increased risk of many cardio-metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes. Weight loss is therefore a desirable goal for sedentary adults with obesity. Weight loss is also a well-documented side effect of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition, a pharmaceutical strategy for diabetes treatment. We hypothesized that, compared with placebo, SGLT2 inhibition as an adjunct to out-patient dietary counselling for weight loss would lead to more favorable modification of body mass and composition, and greater improvement in glucose regulation and lipid profile. Using a randomized, double-blind, repeated measures parallel design, 50 sedentary men and women (body mass index: 33.4 ± 4.7 kg/m2; mean ± SD) were assigned to 12 weeks of dietary counselling, supplemented with daily ingestion of either a placebo or SGLT2 inhibitor (dapagliflozin: up to 10 mg/day). Dietary counselling favorably modified body mass, body fat, glucose regulation, and fasting concentrations of triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (main effects of counselling: p < 0.05); SGLT2 inhibition did not influence any of these adaptations (counselling × medication interactions: p > 0.05). However, SGLT2 inhibition when combined with dietary counselling led to greater loss of fat-free mass (counselling × medication interaction: p = 0.047) and attenuated the rise in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (counselling × medication interaction: p = 0.028). In light of these data and the health implications of decreased fat-free mass, we recommend careful consideration before implementing SGLT2 inhibition as an adjunct to dietary counselling for weight loss in sedentary adults with obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: weight loss; diabetes; body composition; SGLT2 weight loss; diabetes; body composition; SGLT2
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ryan, S.P.P.; Newman, A.A.; Wilburn, J.R.; Rhoades, L.D.; Trikha, S.R.J.; Godwin, E.C.; Schoenberg, H.M.; Battson, M.L.; Ewell, T.R.; Luckasen, G.J.; Biela, L.M.; Melby, C.L.; Bell, C. Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibition Does Not Favorably Modify the Physiological Responses to Dietary Counselling in Diabetes-Free, Sedentary Overweight and Obese Adult Humans. Nutrients 2020, 12, 510. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12020510

AMA Style

Ryan SPP, Newman AA, Wilburn JR, Rhoades LD, Trikha SRJ, Godwin EC, Schoenberg HM, Battson ML, Ewell TR, Luckasen GJ, Biela LM, Melby CL, Bell C. Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibition Does Not Favorably Modify the Physiological Responses to Dietary Counselling in Diabetes-Free, Sedentary Overweight and Obese Adult Humans. Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):510. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12020510

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ryan, Shane P.P., Alissa A. Newman, Jessie R. Wilburn, Lauren D. Rhoades, S. R.J. Trikha, Ellen C. Godwin, Hayden M. Schoenberg, Micah L. Battson, Taylor R. Ewell, Gary J. Luckasen, Laurie M. Biela, Christopher L. Melby, and Christopher Bell. 2020. "Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibition Does Not Favorably Modify the Physiological Responses to Dietary Counselling in Diabetes-Free, Sedentary Overweight and Obese Adult Humans" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 510. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12020510

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