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Article

Kokumi Taste Active Peptides Modulate Salt and Umami Taste

1
Korea Food Research Institute, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 55365, Korea
2
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 March 2020 / Revised: 21 April 2020 / Accepted: 22 April 2020 / Published: 24 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Salt Taste, Nutrition, and Health)
Kokumi taste substances exemplified by γ-glutamyl peptides and Maillard Peptides modulate salt and umami tastes. However, the underlying mechanism for their action has not been delineated. Here, we investigated the effects of a kokumi taste active and inactive peptide fraction (500–10,000 Da) isolated from mature (FIIm) and immature (FIIim) Ganjang, a typical Korean soy sauce, on salt and umami taste responses in humans and rodents. Only FIIm (0.1–1.0%) produced a biphasic effect in rat chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to lingual stimulation with 100 mM NaCl + 5 μM benzamil, a specific epithelial Na+ channel blocker. Both elevated temperature (42 °C) and FIIm produced synergistic effects on the NaCl + benzamil CT response. At 0.5% FIIm produced the maximum increase in rat CT response to NaCl + benzamil, and enhanced salt taste intensity in human subjects. At 2.5% FIIm enhanced rat CT response to glutamate that was equivalent to the enhancement observed with 1 mM IMP. In human subjects, 0.3% FIIm produced enhancement of umami taste. These results suggest that FIIm modulates amiloride-insensitive salt taste and umami taste at different concentration ranges in rats and humans. View Full-Text
Keywords: Korean soy sauce; kokumi; umami; salty; chorda tympani; amiloride-insensitive salt taste pathway Korean soy sauce; kokumi; umami; salty; chorda tympani; amiloride-insensitive salt taste pathway
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rhyu, M.-R.; Song, A.-Y.; Kim, E.-Y.; Son, H.-J.; Kim, Y.; Mummalaneni, S.; Qian, J.; Grider, J.R.; Lyall, V. Kokumi Taste Active Peptides Modulate Salt and Umami Taste. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1198. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12041198

AMA Style

Rhyu M-R, Song A-Y, Kim E-Y, Son H-J, Kim Y, Mummalaneni S, Qian J, Grider JR, Lyall V. Kokumi Taste Active Peptides Modulate Salt and Umami Taste. Nutrients. 2020; 12(4):1198. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12041198

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rhyu, Mee-Ra, Ah-Young Song, Eun-Young Kim, Hee-Jin Son, Yiseul Kim, Shobha Mummalaneni, Jie Qian, John R. Grider, and Vijay Lyall. 2020. "Kokumi Taste Active Peptides Modulate Salt and Umami Taste" Nutrients 12, no. 4: 1198. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu12041198

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