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A Comparison of Sugar Intake between Individuals with High and Low Trait Anxiety: Results from the NutriNet-Santé Study

1
Nutritional Epidemiology Research Group (EREN), Sorbonne Paris Nord University, INSERM U1153/INRAE U1125/CNAM, Epidemiology and Statistics Research Centre (CRESS), University of Paris, 93017 Bobigny, France
2
Department of Psychiatry, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9, Canada
3
Department of Public Health, AP-HP Avicenne Hospital, 93017 Bobigny, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emily Sonestedt
Received: 11 March 2021 / Revised: 26 April 2021 / Accepted: 27 April 2021 / Published: 30 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Epidemiology)
(1) Background: Dietary carbohydrates are likely correlated with mental health in general, and with anxiety in particular. Our aim was to investigate the cross-sectional relationship between trait anxiety and carbohydrate (especially sugar) intake in a large sample derived from the general French population. (2) Methods: The analyses included 20,231 non-diabetic adults enrolled in the NutriNet-Santé e-cohort, who had completed the trait anxiety subscale of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (T-STAI, 2013–2016) and who were subsequently divided into high and low trait anxiety groups (T-STAI cut-off of 40 points). Sugar-rich food and macronutrient intake was calculated from ≥3 self-administered 24-h dietary records. The association between trait anxiety and carbohydrate intake was evaluated by ANCOVA according to age category (<45 and ≥45 years). (3) Results: In the full sample, 7942 (39.3%) individuals fell into the high trait anxiety category. They were more likely to be women (82.2% versus 69.2%; p < 0.0001) and younger (mean age 51.6 versus 55.1 years; p < 0.0001) compared to the low trait anxiety group. In fully-adjusted models, high-anxiety individuals aged under 45 years had significantly higher mean consumption of added simple sugars (43.9 versus 42.3 g/d; p < 0.0007), whereas those aged over 45 years with high trait anxiety had significantly lower mean consumption of fruit (214.0 versus 219.5 g/d; p < 0.02) compared to their low-anxiety counterparts. (4) Conclusions: This cross-sectional study revealed modest age-specific associations between anxiety status and sugar intake among adults. Prospective studies with representative samples are needed to explore potential bi-directionality of the observed associations. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; dietary sugars; carbohydrates; anxiety; mental health; epidemiological study diet; dietary sugars; carbohydrates; anxiety; mental health; epidemiological study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kose, J.; Cheung, A.; Fezeu, L.K.; Péneau, S.; Debras, C.; Touvier, M.; Hercberg, S.; Galan, P.; Andreeva, V.A. A Comparison of Sugar Intake between Individuals with High and Low Trait Anxiety: Results from the NutriNet-Santé Study. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1526. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051526

AMA Style

Kose J, Cheung A, Fezeu LK, Péneau S, Debras C, Touvier M, Hercberg S, Galan P, Andreeva VA. A Comparison of Sugar Intake between Individuals with High and Low Trait Anxiety: Results from the NutriNet-Santé Study. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1526. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051526

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kose, Junko, Adrienne Cheung, Léopold K. Fezeu, Sandrine Péneau, Charlotte Debras, Mathilde Touvier, Serge Hercberg, Pilar Galan, and Valentina A. Andreeva 2021. "A Comparison of Sugar Intake between Individuals with High and Low Trait Anxiety: Results from the NutriNet-Santé Study" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1526. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13051526

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