Next Article in Journal
COVID-19 Vaccines in Children with Cow’s Milk and Food Allergies
Previous Article in Journal
Universal School Meals in the US: What Can We Learn from the Community Eligibility Provision?
Systematic Review

Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages Consumption Linked to Type 2 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

1
National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Fruits and Vegetables, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2
Key Laboratory of Plant Protein and Grain Processing, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
3
Xinghua Industrial Research Centre for Food Science and Human Health, China Agricultural University, Xinghua 225700, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emily Sonestedt
Received: 2 July 2021 / Revised: 20 July 2021 / Accepted: 26 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Although studies have examined the association between habitual consumption of sugar- (SSBs) and artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) and health outcomes, the results are inconclusive. Here, we conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies in order to summarize the relationship between SSBs and ASBs consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), and all-cause mortality. All relevant articles were systematically searched in PubMed, Embase, and Ovid databases until 20 June 2020. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for analysis. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using random effects or fixed-effects model for highest versus lowest intake categories, as well as for linear and non-linear relationships. With each additional SSB and ASB serving per day, the risk increased by 27% (RR: 1.27, 95%CI: 1.15–1.41, I2 = 80.8%) and 13% (95%CI: 1.03–1.25, I2 = 78.7%) for T2D, 9% (RR: 1.09, 95%CI: 1.07–1.12, I2 = 42.7%) and 8% (RR: 1.08, 95%CI: 1.04–1.11, I2 = 45.5%) for CVDs, and 10% (RR: 1.10, 95%CI: 0.97–1.26, I2 = 86.3%) and 7% (RR: 1.07, 95%CI: 0.91–1.25, I2 = 76.9%) for all-cause mortality. Linear relationships were found for SSBs with T2D and CVDs. Non-linear relationships were found for ASBs with T2D, CVDs, and all-cause mortality and for SSBs with all-cause mortality. The findings from the current meta-analysis indicate that increased consumption of SSBs and ASBs is associated with the risk of T2D, CVDs, and all-cause mortality. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; artificially sweetened beverages; type 2 diabetes; cardiovascular diseases; all-cause mortality sugar-sweetened beverages; artificially sweetened beverages; type 2 diabetes; cardiovascular diseases; all-cause mortality
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Meng, Y.; Li, S.; Khan, J.; Dai, Z.; Li, C.; Hu, X.; Shen, Q.; Xue, Y. Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages Consumption Linked to Type 2 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082636

AMA Style

Meng Y, Li S, Khan J, Dai Z, Li C, Hu X, Shen Q, Xue Y. Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages Consumption Linked to Type 2 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082636

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meng, Yantong, Siqi Li, Jabir Khan, Zijian Dai, Chang Li, Xiaosong Hu, Qun Shen, and Yong Xue. 2021. "Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages Consumption Linked to Type 2 Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases, and All-Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nu13082636

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop