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The Key Role of Phosphate on Vascular Calcification

1
Renal Division, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, 20142 Milan, Italy
2
Renal Research Laboratory, Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplant, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico & Fondazione D’Amico per la Ricerca sulle Malattie Renali, 20122 Milan, Italy
3
Cardiology Unit, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, 20142 Milan, Italy
4
Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), Nephrology, Dialysis and Renal Transplant Unit, S. Orsola Hospital, University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 7 April 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Chronic Kidney Disease - Mineral Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD))
Vascular calcification (VC) is common in dialysis and non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, even in the early stage of the disease. For this reason, it can be considered a CKD hallmark. VC contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and increased mortality among CKD patients, although it has not been proven. There are more than one type of VC and every form represents a marker of systemic vascular disease and is associated with a higher prevalence of CVD in CKD patients, as shown by several clinical studies. Major risk factors for VC in CKD include: Increasing age, dialysis vintage, hyperphosphatemia (particularly in the setting of intermittent or persistent hypercalcemia), and a positive net calcium and phosphate balance. Excessive oral calcium intake, including calcium-containing phosphate binders, increases the risk for VC. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that there is less VC progression with non-calcium-containing phosphate binders. Unfortunately, until now, a specific therapy to prevent progression or to facilitate regression of VC has been found, beyond careful attention to calcium and phosphate balance. View Full-Text
Keywords: hyperphosphatemia; chronic kidney disease; secondary hyperparathyroidism; vascular calcification; phosphate binder hyperphosphatemia; chronic kidney disease; secondary hyperparathyroidism; vascular calcification; phosphate binder
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cozzolino, M.; Ciceri, P.; Galassi, A.; Mangano, M.; Carugo, S.; Capelli, I.; Cianciolo, G. The Key Role of Phosphate on Vascular Calcification. Toxins 2019, 11, 213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins11040213

AMA Style

Cozzolino M, Ciceri P, Galassi A, Mangano M, Carugo S, Capelli I, Cianciolo G. The Key Role of Phosphate on Vascular Calcification. Toxins. 2019; 11(4):213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins11040213

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cozzolino, Mario, Paola Ciceri, Andrea Galassi, Michela Mangano, Stefano Carugo, Irene Capelli, and Giuseppe Cianciolo. 2019. "The Key Role of Phosphate on Vascular Calcification" Toxins 11, no. 4: 213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins11040213

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