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Article

Removal of Positively Buoyant Planktothrix rubescens in Lake Restoration

1
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 3a, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
2
Water Authority Brabantse Delta, Team Knowledge, P.O. Box 5520, 4801 DZ Breda, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 October 2020 / Revised: 2 November 2020 / Accepted: 3 November 2020 / Published: 5 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Removal of Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins in Waters)
The combination of a low-dose coagulant (polyaluminium chloride—‘Floc’) and a ballast able to bind phosphate (lanthanum modified bentonite, LMB—‘Sink/Lock’) have been used successfully to manage cyanobacterial blooms and eutrophication. In a recent ‘Floc and Lock’ intervention in Lake de Kuil (the Netherlands), cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a was reduced by 90% but, surprisingly, after one week elevated cyanobacterial concentrations were observed again that faded away during following weeks. Hence, to better understand why and how to avoid an increase in cyanobacterial concentration, experiments with collected cyanobacteria from Lakes De Kuil and Rauwbraken were performed. We showed that the Planktothrix rubescens from Lake de Kuil could initially be precipitated using a coagulant and ballast but, after one day, most of the filaments resurfaced again, even using a higher ballast dose. By contrast, the P. rubescens from Lake Rauwbraken remained precipitated after the Floc and Sink/Lock treatment. We highlight the need to test selected measures for each lake as the same technique with similar species (P. rubescens) yielded different results. Moreover, we show that damaging the cells first with hydrogen peroxide before adding the coagulant and ballast (a ‘Kill, Floc and Lock/Sink’ approach) could be promising to keep P. rubescens precipitated. View Full-Text
Keywords: in-lake measures; lake restoration; Floc and Lock; Kill; Floc and sink; Hydrogen peroxide; Phoslock; PAC in-lake measures; lake restoration; Floc and Lock; Kill; Floc and sink; Hydrogen peroxide; Phoslock; PAC
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lürling, M.; Mucci, M.; Waajen, G. Removal of Positively Buoyant Planktothrix rubescens in Lake Restoration. Toxins 2020, 12, 700. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12110700

AMA Style

Lürling M, Mucci M, Waajen G. Removal of Positively Buoyant Planktothrix rubescens in Lake Restoration. Toxins. 2020; 12(11):700. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12110700

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lürling, Miquel, Maíra Mucci, and Guido Waajen. 2020. "Removal of Positively Buoyant Planktothrix rubescens in Lake Restoration" Toxins 12, no. 11: 700. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12110700

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