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Article

Degradation and Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Tea-Derived Aspergillus niger RAF106

1
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
Lingnan Guangdong Laboratory of Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou 510642, China
3
Guangdong Open Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangdong Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510070, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 November 2020 / Accepted: 2 December 2020 / Published: 6 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mycotoxins: Toxicity and Biological Detoxification)
Microbial degradation is an effective and attractive method for eliminating aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which is severely toxic to humans and animals. In this study, Aspergillus niger RAF106 could effectively degrade AFB1 when cultivated in Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB) with contents of AFB1 ranging from 0.1 to 4 μg/mL. Treatment with yeast extract as a nitrogen source stimulated the degradation, but treatment with NaNO3 and NaNO2 as nitrogen sources and lactose and sucrose as carbon sources suppressed the degradation. Moreover, A. niger RAF106 still degraded AFB1 at initial pH values that ranged from 4 to 10 and at cultivation temperatures that ranged from 25 to 45 °C. In addition, intracellular enzymes or proteins with excellent thermotolerance were verified as being able to degrade AFB1 into metabolites with low or no mutagenicity. Furthermore, genomic sequence analysis indicated that the fungus was considered to be safe owing to the absence of virulence genes and the gene clusters for the synthesis of mycotoxins. These results indicate that A. niger RAF106 and its intracellular enzymes or proteins have a promising potential to be applied commercially in the processing and industry of food and feed to detoxify AFB1. View Full-Text
Keywords: aflatoxin B1; Aspergillus niger; intracellular extracts; Ames test; genome sequencing aflatoxin B1; Aspergillus niger; intracellular extracts; Ames test; genome sequencing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fang, Q.; Du, M.; Chen, J.; Liu, T.; Zheng, Y.; Liao, Z.; Zhong, Q.; Wang, L.; Fang, X.; Wang, J. Degradation and Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Tea-Derived Aspergillus niger RAF106. Toxins 2020, 12, 777. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12120777

AMA Style

Fang Q, Du M, Chen J, Liu T, Zheng Y, Liao Z, Zhong Q, Wang L, Fang X, Wang J. Degradation and Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Tea-Derived Aspergillus niger RAF106. Toxins. 2020; 12(12):777. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12120777

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fang, Qian’an, Minru Du, Jianwen Chen, Tong Liu, Yong Zheng, Zhenlin Liao, Qingping Zhong, Li Wang, Xiang Fang, and Jie Wang. 2020. "Degradation and Detoxification of Aflatoxin B1 by Tea-Derived Aspergillus niger RAF106" Toxins 12, no. 12: 777. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12120777

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