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Review

Drug Delivery Strategies for Enhancing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Toxin-Derived Anti-Diabetic Peptides

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College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju Daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828, Korea
2
College of Pharmacy and Inje Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Inje University, 197 Injero, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 50834, Korea
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Department of Ophthalmology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 75 Bokjiro, Busanjin-gu, Busan 47392, Korea
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T2B Infrastructure Center for Ocular Disease, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, 81 Jinsaro 83 Beon-gil, Busanjin-gu, Busan 47397, Korea
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Division of Cancer Biology, National Cancer Center, 323 Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do 10408, Korea
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College of Pharmacy, Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-ro, Suncheon, Jeonnam 57922, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 April 2020 / Revised: 4 May 2020 / Accepted: 6 May 2020 / Published: 10 May 2020
Toxin peptides derived from the skin secretions of amphibians possess unique hypoglycemic activities. Many of these peptides share cationic and amphipathic structural similarities and appear to possess cell-penetrating abilities. The mechanism of their insulinotropic action is yet not elucidated, but they have shown great potential in regulating the blood glucose levels in animal models. Therefore, they have emerged as potential drug candidates as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. Despite their anti-diabetic activity, there remain pharmaceutical challenges to be addressed for their clinical applications. Here, we present an overview of recent studies related to the toxin-derived anti-diabetic peptides derived from the skin secretions of amphibians. In the latter part, we introduce the bottleneck challenges for their delivery in vivo and general drug delivery strategies that may be applicable to extend their blood circulation time. We focus our research on the strategies that have been successfully applied to improve the plasma half-life of exendin-4, a clinically available toxin-derived anti-diabetic peptide drug. View Full-Text
Keywords: toxin; diabetes; anti-diabetic peptide; drug delivery; plasma half-life; cell-penetrating peptide toxin; diabetes; anti-diabetic peptide; drug delivery; plasma half-life; cell-penetrating peptide
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amatya, R.; Park, T.; Hwang, S.; Yang, J.; Lee, Y.; Cheong, H.; Moon, C.; Kwak, H.D.; Min, K.A.; Shin, M.C. Drug Delivery Strategies for Enhancing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Toxin-Derived Anti-Diabetic Peptides. Toxins 2020, 12, 313. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12050313

AMA Style

Amatya R, Park T, Hwang S, Yang J, Lee Y, Cheong H, Moon C, Kwak HD, Min KA, Shin MC. Drug Delivery Strategies for Enhancing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Toxin-Derived Anti-Diabetic Peptides. Toxins. 2020; 12(5):313. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12050313

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amatya, Reeju, Taehoon Park, Seungmi Hwang, JaeWook Yang, Yoonjin Lee, Heesun Cheong, Cheol Moon, Hyun D. Kwak, Kyoung A. Min, and Meong C. Shin 2020. "Drug Delivery Strategies for Enhancing the Therapeutic Efficacy of Toxin-Derived Anti-Diabetic Peptides" Toxins 12, no. 5: 313. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12050313

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