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Article

Comparative Toxigenicity and Associated Mutagenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus Group Isolates Collected from the Agricultural Environment

1
Faculty of Health, Normandie University, UNICAEN, Centre F. Baclesse, UR ABTE EA4651, 14000 Caen, France
2
Faculty of Sports, Normandie University, UNIROUEN, CETAPS EA3832, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan CEDEX, France
3
Laboratoire LABEO, Route de Rosel, 14280 Saint-Contest, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 June 2020 / Revised: 15 July 2020 / Accepted: 16 July 2020 / Published: 17 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Single and Combined Mycotoxins)
The mutagenic patterns of A. flavus, A. parasiticus and A. fumigatus extracts were evaluated. These strains of toxigenic Aspergillus were collected from the agricultural environment. The Ames test was performed on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100 and TA102, without and with S9mix (exogenous metabolic activation system). These data were compared with the mutagenicity of the corresponding pure mycotoxins tested alone or in reconstituted mixtures with equivalent concentrations, in order to investigate the potential interactions between these molecules and/or other natural metabolites. At least 3 mechanisms are involved in the mutagenic response of these aflatoxins: firstly, the formation of AFB1-8,9-epoxide upon addition of S9mix, secondly the likely formation of oxidative damage as indicated by significant responses in TA102, and thirdly, a direct mutagenicity observed for higher doses of some extracts or associated mycotoxins, which does not therefore involve exogenously activated intermediates. Besides the identified mycotoxins (AFB1, AFB2 and AFM1), additional “natural” compounds contribute to the global mutagenicity of the extracts. On the other hand, AFB2 and AFM1 modulate negatively the mutagenicity of AFB1 when mixed in binary or tertiary mixtures. Thus, the evaluation of the mutagenicity of “natural” mixtures is an integrated parameter that better reflects the potential impact of exposure to toxigenic Aspergilli. View Full-Text
Keywords: toxigenicity; mutagenicity; mycotoxin mixtures; mycotoxin interactions; Aspergilli toxigenicity; mutagenicity; mycotoxin mixtures; mycotoxin interactions; Aspergilli
MDPI and ACS Style

Lanier, C.; Garon, D.; Heutte, N.; Kientz, V.; André, V. Comparative Toxigenicity and Associated Mutagenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus Group Isolates Collected from the Agricultural Environment. Toxins 2020, 12, 458. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12070458

AMA Style

Lanier C, Garon D, Heutte N, Kientz V, André V. Comparative Toxigenicity and Associated Mutagenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus Group Isolates Collected from the Agricultural Environment. Toxins. 2020; 12(7):458. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12070458

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lanier, Caroline, David Garon, Natacha Heutte, Valérie Kientz, and Véronique André. 2020. "Comparative Toxigenicity and Associated Mutagenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus Group Isolates Collected from the Agricultural Environment" Toxins 12, no. 7: 458. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins12070458

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