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Open AccessArticle

Shellfish Toxin Uptake and Depuration in Multiple Atlantic Canadian Molluscan Species: Application to Selection of Sentinel Species in Monitoring Programs

1
Dartmouth Laboratory, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 1992 Agency Drive, Dartmouth, NS B3B 1Y9, Canada
2
New Brunswick Operations, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 99 Mount Pleasant Road, P.O. Box 1036, St. George, NB E5C 3S9, Canada
3
St. Andrews Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 125 Marine Science Drive, St. Andrews, NB E5B 0E4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 January 2021 / Revised: 10 February 2021 / Accepted: 15 February 2021 / Published: 22 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Toxins from Harmful Algae and Seafood Safety)
Shellfish toxin monitoring programs often use mussels as the sentinel species to represent risk in other bivalve shellfish species. Studies have examined accumulation and depuration rates in various species, but little information is available to compare multiple species from the same harvest area. A 2-year research project was performed to validate the use of mussels as the sentinel species to represent other relevant eastern Canadian shellfish species (clams, scallops, and oysters). Samples were collected simultaneously from Deadmans Harbour, NB, and were tested for paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and amnesic shellfish toxin (AST). Phytoplankton was also monitored at this site. Scallops accumulated PSTs and AST sooner, at higher concentrations, and retained toxins longer than mussels. Data from monitoring program samples in Mahone Bay, NS, are presented as a real-world validation of findings. Simultaneous sampling of mussels and scallops showed significant differences between shellfish toxin results in these species. These data suggest more consideration should be given to situations where multiple species are present, especially scallops. View Full-Text
Keywords: shellfish; marine toxins; monitoring; phytoplankton; sentinel species shellfish; marine toxins; monitoring; phytoplankton; sentinel species
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rourke, W.A.; Justason, A.; Martin, J.L.; Murphy, C.J. Shellfish Toxin Uptake and Depuration in Multiple Atlantic Canadian Molluscan Species: Application to Selection of Sentinel Species in Monitoring Programs. Toxins 2021, 13, 168. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13020168

AMA Style

Rourke WA, Justason A, Martin JL, Murphy CJ. Shellfish Toxin Uptake and Depuration in Multiple Atlantic Canadian Molluscan Species: Application to Selection of Sentinel Species in Monitoring Programs. Toxins. 2021; 13(2):168. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13020168

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rourke, Wade A.; Justason, Andrew; Martin, Jennifer L.; Murphy, Cory J. 2021. "Shellfish Toxin Uptake and Depuration in Multiple Atlantic Canadian Molluscan Species: Application to Selection of Sentinel Species in Monitoring Programs" Toxins 13, no. 2: 168. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/toxins13020168

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