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Article

Boiler Combustion Optimization of Vegetal Crop Residues from Greenhouses

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Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Almería, Carretera de Sacramento, La Cañada de San Urbano, 04120 Almería, Spain
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Solar Energy Research Centre (CIESOL), Joint Centre University of Almería-CIEMAT, 04120 Almería, Spain
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Las Palmerillas Experimental Station, Cajamar Caja Rural Foundation, 04710 Almería, Spain
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Automatic Control, Robotics and Mechatronic Research Group (TEP 197), Department of Informatics, University of Almería, Carretera de Sacramento, not numbered, 04120 Almería, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Astley Hastings
Received: 21 February 2021 / Revised: 10 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 25 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Technologies Applied to Agriculture and Biotechnology)
This work presents an alternative for adding value to greenhouse crop residues, used for (1) heating and (2) as a CO2 source. Both options are focused on greenhouse agricultural production, but could be applied to other applications. The influence of factors, such as the air/fuel rate and turbulence inside the combustion chamber, is studied. Our results show that for pine pellets, olive pits, tomato-crop residues, and a blend of the latter mixed with almond prunings (75–25%), the thermal losses ranged from 19.5–53.1, 20.5–58.9, 39.9–95%, and 29.4–75.5%, respectively, while the NOX emissions were 30–247, 411–1792, and 361–2333 mg/Nm3, respectively. The above-mentioned blend was identified as the best set-up. The thermal losses were 39.2%, and the CO, NOX, and SO2 concentrations were 11,690, 906, and 1134 mg/Nm3, respectively (the gas concentration values were recalculated for 0% O2). Currently, no other work exists in the literature include a similar analysis performed using a boiler with a comparable thermal output (160.46 kW). The optimal configurations comply with the relevant local legislation. This optimization is important for future emission control strategies relating to using crop residues as a CO2 source. The work also highlights the importance of ensuring a proper boiler set-up for each case considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomass combustion; boiler efficiency; waste valorization; CO2 storage; heating applications; waste heat source biomass combustion; boiler efficiency; waste valorization; CO2 storage; heating applications; waste heat source
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reinoso Moreno, J.V.; Pinna Hernández, M.G.; Fernández Fernández, M.D.; Sánchez Molina, J.A.; López Hernández, J.C.; Acién Fernández, F.G. Boiler Combustion Optimization of Vegetal Crop Residues from Greenhouses. Agronomy 2021, 11, 626. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11040626

AMA Style

Reinoso Moreno JV, Pinna Hernández MG, Fernández Fernández MD, Sánchez Molina JA, López Hernández JC, Acién Fernández FG. Boiler Combustion Optimization of Vegetal Crop Residues from Greenhouses. Agronomy. 2021; 11(4):626. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11040626

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reinoso Moreno, José V., María G. Pinna Hernández, María D. Fernández Fernández, Jorge A. Sánchez Molina, Juan C. López Hernández, and Francisco G. Acién Fernández 2021. "Boiler Combustion Optimization of Vegetal Crop Residues from Greenhouses" Agronomy 11, no. 4: 626. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agronomy11040626

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