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Article

Mitochondrial DNA Profiles of Individuals from a 12th Century Necropolis in Feldioara (Transylvania)

1
Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babeș-Bolyai University, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
2
Molecular Biology Center, Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babeș-Bolyai University, 400271 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
3
Vasile Pârvan Institute of Archaeology, Romanian Academy, 010667 Bucharest, Romania
4
Centre for Systems Biology, Biodiversity, and Bioresources, Babeș-Bolyai University, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Antonio Amorim
Received: 25 January 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 March 2021 / Published: 19 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ancient and Archaic Genomes)
The genetic signature of modern Europeans is the cumulated result of millennia of discrete small-scale exchanges between multiple distinct population groups that performed a repeated cycle of movement, settlement, and interactions with each other. In this study we aimed to highlight one such minute genetic cycle in a sea of genetic interactions by reconstructing part of the genetic story of the migration, settlement, interaction, and legacy of what is today the Transylvanian Saxon. The analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of 13 medieval individuals from Feldioara necropolis (Transylvania region, Romania) reveals a genetically heterogeneous group where all identified haplotypes are different. Most of the perceived maternal lineages are of Western Eurasian origin, except for the Central Asiatic haplogroup C seen in only one sample. Comparisons with historical and modern populations describe the contribution of the investigated Saxon settlers to the genetic history of this part of Europe. View Full-Text
Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; medieval individuals; Transylvania; population genetics mitochondrial DNA; medieval individuals; Transylvania; population genetics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gînguță, A.; Rusu, I.; Mircea, C.; Ioniță, A.; Banciu, H.L.; Kelemen, B. Mitochondrial DNA Profiles of Individuals from a 12th Century Necropolis in Feldioara (Transylvania). Genes 2021, 12, 436. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12030436

AMA Style

Gînguță A, Rusu I, Mircea C, Ioniță A, Banciu HL, Kelemen B. Mitochondrial DNA Profiles of Individuals from a 12th Century Necropolis in Feldioara (Transylvania). Genes. 2021; 12(3):436. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12030436

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gînguță, Alexandra, Ioana Rusu, Cristina Mircea, Adrian Ioniță, Horia L. Banciu, and Beatrice Kelemen. 2021. "Mitochondrial DNA Profiles of Individuals from a 12th Century Necropolis in Feldioara (Transylvania)" Genes 12, no. 3: 436. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/genes12030436

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