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Quantitative Epigenetics: A New Avenue for Crop Improvement

1
Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh 176061, India
2
Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-IHBT, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh 176061, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 September 2020 / Revised: 24 October 2020 / Accepted: 4 November 2020 / Published: 7 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Plant Epigenetics and Epigenomics)
Plant breeding conventionally depends on genetic variability available in a species to improve a particular trait in the crop. However, epigenetic diversity may provide an additional tier of variation. The recent advent of epigenome technologies has elucidated the role of epigenetic variation in shaping phenotype. Furthermore, the development of epigenetic recombinant inbred lines (epi-RILs) in model species such as Arabidopsis has enabled accurate genetic analysis of epigenetic variation. Subsequently, mapping of epigenetic quantitative trait loci (epiQTL) allowed association between epialleles and phenotypic traits. Likewise, epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) and epi-genotyping by sequencing (epi-GBS) have revolutionized the field of epigenetics research in plants. Thus, quantitative epigenetics provides ample opportunities to dissect the role of epigenetic variation in trait regulation, which can be eventually utilized in crop improvement programs. Moreover, locus-specific manipulation of DNA methylation by epigenome-editing tools such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) can potentially facilitate epigenetic based molecular breeding of important crop plants. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA methylation; epialleles; epiRILs; epigenetics; epigenome-wide association studies DNA methylation; epialleles; epiRILs; epigenetics; epigenome-wide association studies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gahlaut, V.; Zinta, G.; Jaiswal, V.; Kumar, S. Quantitative Epigenetics: A New Avenue for Crop Improvement. Epigenomes 2020, 4, 25. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epigenomes4040025

AMA Style

Gahlaut V, Zinta G, Jaiswal V, Kumar S. Quantitative Epigenetics: A New Avenue for Crop Improvement. Epigenomes. 2020; 4(4):25. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epigenomes4040025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gahlaut, Vijay; Zinta, Gaurav; Jaiswal, Vandana; Kumar, Sanjay. 2020. "Quantitative Epigenetics: A New Avenue for Crop Improvement" Epigenomes 4, no. 4: 25. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/epigenomes4040025

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