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Article

Daily School Physical Activity from before to after Puberty Improves Bone Mass and a Musculoskeletal Composite Risk Score for Fracture

1
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmo, Sweden
2
Department of Physiology and Clinical Sciences, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmo, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 February 2020 / Revised: 25 March 2020 / Accepted: 26 March 2020 / Published: 28 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity for Health in Youth)
This 7.5-year prospective controlled exercise intervention study assessed if daily school physical activity (PA), from before to after puberty, improved musculoskeletal traits. There were 63 boys and 34 girls in the intervention group (40 min PA/day), and 26 boys and 17 girls in the control group (60 min PA/week). We measured musculoskeletal traits at the start and end of the study. The overall musculoskeletal effect of PA was also estimated by a composite score (mean Z-score of the lumbar spine bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), total body lean mass (TBLM), calcaneal ultrasound (speed of sound (SOS)), and muscle strength (knee flexion peak torque)). We used analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) for group comparisons. Compared to the gender-matched control group, intervention boys reached higher gains in BMC, BA, muscle strength, as well as in the composite score, and intervention girls higher gains in BMC, BA, SOS, as well as in the composite score (all p < 0.05, respectively). Our small sample study indicates that a daily school-based PA intervention program from Tanner stage 1 to 5 in both sexes is associated with greater bone mineral accrual, greater gain in bone size, and a greater gain in a musculoskeletal composite score for fractures. View Full-Text
Keywords: bone mineral content; bone mineral density; bone size; boys; children; exercise; girls; muscle strength; muscle mass; physical activity; puberty; Tanner stage bone mineral content; bone mineral density; bone size; boys; children; exercise; girls; muscle strength; muscle mass; physical activity; puberty; Tanner stage
MDPI and ACS Style

Cronholm, F.; Lindgren, E.; Rosengren, B.E.; Dencker, M.; Karlsson, C.; Karlsson, M.K. Daily School Physical Activity from before to after Puberty Improves Bone Mass and a Musculoskeletal Composite Risk Score for Fracture. Sports 2020, 8, 40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports8040040

AMA Style

Cronholm F, Lindgren E, Rosengren BE, Dencker M, Karlsson C, Karlsson MK. Daily School Physical Activity from before to after Puberty Improves Bone Mass and a Musculoskeletal Composite Risk Score for Fracture. Sports. 2020; 8(4):40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports8040040

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cronholm, Felix, Erik Lindgren, Björn E. Rosengren, Magnus Dencker, Caroline Karlsson, and Magnus K. Karlsson. 2020. "Daily School Physical Activity from before to after Puberty Improves Bone Mass and a Musculoskeletal Composite Risk Score for Fracture" Sports 8, no. 4: 40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sports8040040

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