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Standing by or Standing Up?—How Philosophy Can (In)form Our Understanding of Bystander Behaviours in Workplace Bullying Dynamics

by 1,* and 2
1
School of Education, University College Dublin, D04 V1W8 Dublin, Ireland
2
Marino Institute of Education, D09 R232 Dublin, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Margaret Hodgins
Received: 24 February 2021 / Revised: 22 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 25 March 2021
There is increasing awareness of the value of interdisciplinary collaboration within academia. Scholars argue that by drawing upon the conceptual, methodological, and interrogative paradigms of at least two disparate disciplines, researchers are challenged to re-evaluate and reconsider their own discipline-centric assumptions. A consequence of such purposeful boundary-blurring is an increased rigour and richness in the analysis of raw data, as well as the development of revealing insights through the novel application of discrete conceptual perspectives and theories. In such a way, dominant, taken-for-granted methodological and analytical assumptions are destabilised, as researchers are obliged to embrace contrasting perspectives while reassessing the epistemological foundations of their work. This paper focuses on the phenomenon of bystander responses to workplace bullying dynamics. While traditional scholarship into workplace bullying emanates from disciplines such as business, psychology, law, medicine and sociology, for example, this paper argues that philosophy, as a subject/field, may provide the researcher with a fresh interrogative lens through which to (re)view the phenomenon of workplace bullying, along with the consequential response of bystanders to such noxious behaviours. It suggests that, by drawing upon the philosophical concept of virtue ethics—which posits the question “What would a good or virtuous person do?”—we are afforded a robust theoretical framework to support a thoughtful and reasoned destabilization of contemporary perspectives on bystander behaviours and motivations. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace bullying; bystanders; interdisciplinary research; philosophy; virtue ethics workplace bullying; bystanders; interdisciplinary research; philosophy; virtue ethics
MDPI and ACS Style

Fahie, D.; Dunne, G. Standing by or Standing Up?—How Philosophy Can (In)form Our Understanding of Bystander Behaviours in Workplace Bullying Dynamics. Societies 2021, 11, 28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020028

AMA Style

Fahie D, Dunne G. Standing by or Standing Up?—How Philosophy Can (In)form Our Understanding of Bystander Behaviours in Workplace Bullying Dynamics. Societies. 2021; 11(2):28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fahie, Declan, and Gerry Dunne. 2021. "Standing by or Standing Up?—How Philosophy Can (In)form Our Understanding of Bystander Behaviours in Workplace Bullying Dynamics" Societies 11, no. 2: 28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11020028

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