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Concept Paper

Tourism and Livelihood Sovereignty: A Theoretical Introduction and Research Agenda for Arctic Contexts

1
Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
2
Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management, and Anthropology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Iulia Cristina Muresan, Horațiu Felix Arion and Diana Elena Dumitraș
Received: 4 August 2021 / Revised: 20 August 2021 / Accepted: 24 August 2021 / Published: 31 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rural Tourism and Community Development)
The need to understand how Arctic coastal communities can remain resilient in the wake of rapid anthropogenic change that is disproportionately affecting the region—including, but not limited to, climate instability and the increasing reach of the tourism sector—is more urgent than ever. With sovereignty discourse at the forefront of Arctic sustainability research, integrating existing sovereignty scholarship into the tourism literature yields new theory-building opportunities. The purpose of this paper is to conceptually analyze the implications of (1) applying both theoretical and social movement ideas about sovereignty to tourism research in Arctic coastal communities, (2) the extent to which these ideas revolve around livelihood sovereignty in particular, (3) the influence of existing tourism development on shifting livelihood sovereignty dynamics, and, ultimately, (4) the opportunities for further research that enables more sovereign sustainable tourism development across the Arctic region. Given the northward march of the tourism frontier across Arctic regions, an exploration of tourism’s influence on sovereignty presents a timely opportunity to advance theory and promote policy incentives for forms of tourism development that are more likely to yield sustainable and resilient outcomes for Arctic communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: sovereignty; livelihoods; community development; sustainability; cruise tourism sovereignty; livelihoods; community development; sustainability; cruise tourism
MDPI and ACS Style

Naylor, R.S.; Hunt, C.A. Tourism and Livelihood Sovereignty: A Theoretical Introduction and Research Agenda for Arctic Contexts. Societies 2021, 11, 105. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030105

AMA Style

Naylor RS, Hunt CA. Tourism and Livelihood Sovereignty: A Theoretical Introduction and Research Agenda for Arctic Contexts. Societies. 2021; 11(3):105. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030105

Chicago/Turabian Style

Naylor, Ryan S., and Carter A. Hunt 2021. "Tourism and Livelihood Sovereignty: A Theoretical Introduction and Research Agenda for Arctic Contexts" Societies 11, no. 3: 105. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030105

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