Next Article in Journal
Good Lives Model: Importance of Interagency Collaboration in Preventing Violent Recidivism
Previous Article in Journal
Emic Views of Community Resilience and Coastal Tourism Development
Previous Article in Special Issue
Examining the Idea of the ‘Vulnerable Student’ to Assess the Implications for Academic Freedom
Article

‘Mind Your Business and Leave My Rolls Alone’: A Case Study of Fat Black Women Runners’ Decolonial Resistance

1
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK
2
Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 2W6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: David Brown
Received: 31 May 2021 / Revised: 28 July 2021 / Accepted: 29 July 2021 / Published: 11 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Ability Expectation and Ableism Studies (Short Ability Studies))
The Black female body has been vilified, surveilled, and viewed as ‘obese’ and irresponsible for centuries in Western societies. For just as long, some Black women have resisted their mischaracterizations. Instead they have embraced a ‘fat’ identity. But little research has demonstrated how Black fat women participate in sport. The purpose of this study is to show how Black fat women who run use social media to unapologetically celebrate Blackness and fatness. This research uses a case-study approach to illuminate a broader phenomenon of decolonial resistance through running. In addition to analysis of websites, blogs, and news articles devoted to Black women’s running, we discuss the (social) media content of two specific runners: Mirna Valerio and Latoya Shauntay Snell. We performed a critical discourse analysis on 14 media offerings from the two runners, including websites, Twitter pages, and blogs collected over a five-month period from September 2020–January 2021. The analysis examined how they represent themselves and their communities and how they comment on issues of anti-fat bias, neoliberal capitalism, ableist sexism, and white supremacy, some of the pillars of colonialism. Whereas running is often positioned as a weight-loss-focused and white-dominated colonial project, through their very presence and use of strategic communication to amplify their experiences and build community, these runners show how being a Black fat female athlete is an act of decolonial resistance. This study offers a unique sporting example of how fat women challenge obesity discourses and cultural invisibility and how Black athletes communicate anti-racist, decolonial principles. View Full-Text
Keywords: critical discourse analysis; women; sport; running; decolonize; fatness critical discourse analysis; women; sport; running; decolonize; fatness
MDPI and ACS Style

Ashdown-Franks, G.; Joseph, J. ‘Mind Your Business and Leave My Rolls Alone’: A Case Study of Fat Black Women Runners’ Decolonial Resistance. Societies 2021, 11, 95. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030095

AMA Style

Ashdown-Franks G, Joseph J. ‘Mind Your Business and Leave My Rolls Alone’: A Case Study of Fat Black Women Runners’ Decolonial Resistance. Societies. 2021; 11(3):95. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030095

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ashdown-Franks, Garcia, and Janelle Joseph. 2021. "‘Mind Your Business and Leave My Rolls Alone’: A Case Study of Fat Black Women Runners’ Decolonial Resistance" Societies 11, no. 3: 95. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soc11030095

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop