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Article

The Diatomic Diversity of Two Mediterranean High-Elevation Lakes in the Sibillini Mountains National Park (Central Italy)

1
ARPA Umbria, Regional Agency for Environmental Protection, 06100 Perugia, Italy
2
Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnologies University of Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto, 06100 Perugia, Italy
3
Sibillini Mountains National Park, 62039 Visso, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vernon Hodge
Received: 12 July 2021 / Revised: 6 August 2021 / Accepted: 9 August 2021 / Published: 13 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters)
Temporary high-elevation lakes represent vulnerable and unstable environments strongly threatened by tourism, hydrogeological transformations and climate changes. In-depth scientific knowledge on these peculiar habitats is needed, on which to base integrated and sustainable management plans. Freshwater diatoms, thanks to their high diversity and their particular sensitivity to the water chemistry, can be considered powerful ecological indicators, as they are able to reflect environmental changes over time. The aim of the present study was to analyze the diatomic diversity of the Pilato and Palazzo Borghese lakes, two small temporary high-mountain basins, falling in a protected area within the Apennine mountains chain (central Italy). Diatoms data were collected, at the same time as 12 physicochemical parameters, through six microhabitat samplings, from 17 June to 30 August 2019. In both lakes, a total of 111 diatomic species and varieties were identified. The most species-rich genera were Gomphonema, Navicula, and Nitzschia. The Pilato Lake showed a diatomic community dominated by few species, favored by more stable and predictable environmental conditions than the Palazzo Borghese Lake, which hosted a more diversified community, guaranteed by greater spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Both lakes were characterized by the presence of diatomic species typical of good quality waters. The occurrence of numerous aerial species reflected adaptation strategies adopted to colonize environments subjected to extended drought periods. Endangered diatomic species of particular conservational interest were recorded, confirming the need to preserve their habitats. View Full-Text
Keywords: diatom assemblages; Apennine lakes; Pilato lake; Palazzo Borghese lake; biodiversity conservation; climate change diatom assemblages; Apennine lakes; Pilato lake; Palazzo Borghese lake; biodiversity conservation; climate change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Padula, R.; Carosi, A.; Rossetti, A.; Lorenzoni, M. The Diatomic Diversity of Two Mediterranean High-Elevation Lakes in the Sibillini Mountains National Park (Central Italy). Environments 2021, 8, 79. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8080079

AMA Style

Padula R, Carosi A, Rossetti A, Lorenzoni M. The Diatomic Diversity of Two Mediterranean High-Elevation Lakes in the Sibillini Mountains National Park (Central Italy). Environments. 2021; 8(8):79. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8080079

Chicago/Turabian Style

Padula, Rosalba, Antonella Carosi, Alessandro Rossetti, and Massimo Lorenzoni. 2021. "The Diatomic Diversity of Two Mediterranean High-Elevation Lakes in the Sibillini Mountains National Park (Central Italy)" Environments 8, no. 8: 79. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/environments8080079

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