Next Article in Journal
Motivation to Have COVID-19 Vaccination Explained Using an Extended Protection Motivation Theory among University Students in China: The Role of Information Sources
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of Information about COVID-19 Vaccine Effectiveness and Side Effects on Behavioural Intentions: Two Online Experiments
Article

Vaccination and Immunity toward Measles: A Serosurvey in Future Healthcare Workers

1
Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascular Sciences and Public Health, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy
2
Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy
3
Department of Mathematics “Tullio Levi-Civita”, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Steven B. Bradfute
Received: 18 March 2021 / Revised: 8 April 2021 / Accepted: 10 April 2021 / Published: 13 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Vaccines against Infectious Diseases)
Measles is a very contagious infectious disease, and vaccination is the only medical aid to counter the spread of the infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vaccination schedule and type of vaccine, number of doses, and sex on the immune response. In a population of Italian medical students (8497 individuals born after 1980 with certificate of vaccination and quantitative measurement of antibodies against measles), the prevalence of positive antibodies to measles and antibody titer was measured. Vaccination schedule such as number of doses and vaccine type (measles alone or combined as measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)) and sex were the variables considered to influence the immune response. The vaccination schedule depends on the year of birth: students born before 1990 were prevalently vaccinated once and with measles vaccine alone (not as MMR). One dose of vaccine induces a significantly (p < 0.0001) higher positive response and antibody titer than two doses, in particular when measles alone is used (p < 0.0001). Females have a significantly higher percentage of positive response (p = 0.0001) than males but only when the MMR formulation was used. Multiple linear regression confirms that sex significantly influences antibody titer when only MMR is used, after one (p = 0.0002) or two (p = 0.0060) doses. In conclusion, vaccination schedule and, partially, sex influence immune response to measles vaccination. Most notably, the measles vaccine alone (one dose) is more effective than one and two doses of MMR. View Full-Text
Keywords: measles; vaccination schedule; vaccination response; students; healthcare workers measles; vaccination schedule; vaccination response; students; healthcare workers
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Trevisan, A.; Mason, P.; Nicolli, A.; Maso, S.; Scarpa, B.; Moretto, A.; Scapellato, M.L. Vaccination and Immunity toward Measles: A Serosurvey in Future Healthcare Workers. Vaccines 2021, 9, 377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines9040377

AMA Style

Trevisan A, Mason P, Nicolli A, Maso S, Scarpa B, Moretto A, Scapellato ML. Vaccination and Immunity toward Measles: A Serosurvey in Future Healthcare Workers. Vaccines. 2021; 9(4):377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines9040377

Chicago/Turabian Style

Trevisan, Andrea, Paola Mason, Annamaria Nicolli, Stefano Maso, Bruno Scarpa, Angelo Moretto, and Maria L. Scapellato 2021. "Vaccination and Immunity toward Measles: A Serosurvey in Future Healthcare Workers" Vaccines 9, no. 4: 377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/vaccines9040377

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop