Next Article in Journal
Remote Sensing Vegetation Indices in Viticulture: A Critical Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Microbiological Nitrogen Transformations in Soil Treated with Pesticides and Their Impact on Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Previous Article in Journal
Farming Systems Changes in the Urban Shadow: A Mixed Approach Based on Statistical Analysis and Expert Surveys
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium Application Rate on the Young Seedling Growth of Salvadora persica
Article

Influence of Tillage on the Production Inputs, Outputs, Soil Compaction and GHG Emissions

1
Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Mánesova 75, 120 00 Praha 2, Czech Republic
2
Crop Research Institute, Drnovská 507/73, 161 06 Praha 6-Ruzyně, Czech Republic
3
Department of Agroecology and Crop Production, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Praha 6-Suchdol, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luca Vitale, Carmen Arena and Anna Tedeschi
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 13 May 2021 / Accepted: 14 May 2021 / Published: 18 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cropping Systems: Implications on Climate and Environment)
Fertilizer inputs, crop yields, the composition of technological operations and intensity of treatment with different types of pesticides in both basic approaches were evaluated. A comprehensive comparison of impacts showed that all crops, except sugar beet, achieved better economic and emission parameters of production based on the evaluation of GHG production by using reduced tillage compared to ploughing. The total reduction of GHG emissions based on CO2eq on average of all crops per ton as a result of the technological processes was 6% using reduced tillage. The most significant CO2eq reductions were achieved for rye and oat (13%), and spring barley (8%). The reduction of crop yields ranges from about 1% (spring barley) to 4% (grain maize). Cost reduction per tone was in the range of 14% (rye) to 2% (silage maize). The energy gain was at reduced tillage improved at poppy (8%), rape (4%), oat (3%), rye (3%) and spring and winter barley (2%). From the evaluation of the number of chemical protections, a lower number of total protections was found at the no-till system for most crops. In most cases, there was no difference between ploughing and reduced tillage. There was an increase in specific nitrogen consumption per tonne of production in marginal areas, reduced tillage led to an increase in soil compaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: tillage; economy; energy; GHG emissions; pesticides; soil compaction tillage; economy; energy; GHG emissions; pesticides; soil compaction
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Voltr, V.; Wollnerová, J.; Fuksa, P.; Hruška, M. Influence of Tillage on the Production Inputs, Outputs, Soil Compaction and GHG Emissions. Agriculture 2021, 11, 456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11050456

AMA Style

Voltr V, Wollnerová J, Fuksa P, Hruška M. Influence of Tillage on the Production Inputs, Outputs, Soil Compaction and GHG Emissions. Agriculture. 2021; 11(5):456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11050456

Chicago/Turabian Style

Voltr, Václav, Jana Wollnerová, Pavel Fuksa, and Martin Hruška. 2021. "Influence of Tillage on the Production Inputs, Outputs, Soil Compaction and GHG Emissions" Agriculture 11, no. 5: 456. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11050456

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop