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Article

The Relationship between Psycholinguistic Features of Religious Words and Core Dimensions of Religiosity: A Survey Study with Japanese Participants

1
Department of Psychology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8524, Japan
2
Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 October 2020 / Revised: 4 December 2020 / Accepted: 9 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research with the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (CRS))
Previous studies have reported that religious words and religiosity affect mental processes and behaviors. However, it is unclear what psycholinguistic features of religious words (e.g., familiarity, imageability, and emotional aspects) are associated with each dimension of personal religiosity (intellect, ideology, public practice, private practice, and experience). The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how the above-mentioned psycholinguistic features of religious words correlate with each of the core dimensions of religiosity. Japanese participants evaluated four psycholinguistic features of twelve religious words using a 5-point Semantic Differential scale for familiarity and imageability and a 9-point Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM) scale for emotional valence and emotional arousal. The participants also rated their own religiosity using the Japanese version of the Centrality of Religiosity Scale (JCRS). The results of the study revealed that (1) the scales measuring the psycholinguistic features of religious words were statistically reliable; (2) the JCRS was reliable; (3) the familiarity, emotional valence, and emotional arousal of religious words and each mean dimensional score of the JCRS score correlated positively with each other; and (4) highly religious people had higher familiarity and higher emotional arousal to religious words than non-religious people, whereas highly religious people had higher emotional valence to religious words in comparison with non-religious and religious people. In addition, religious people had higher familiarity to religious words than non-religious people. Taken together, these findings suggest that psycholinguistic features of religious words contribute to the detection of religiosity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Centrality of Religiosity Scale; Japanese; psycholinguistics; religious words; religiosity Centrality of Religiosity Scale; Japanese; psycholinguistics; religious words; religiosity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kambara, T.; Umemura, T.; Ackert, M.; Yang, Y. The Relationship between Psycholinguistic Features of Religious Words and Core Dimensions of Religiosity: A Survey Study with Japanese Participants. Religions 2020, 11, 673. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel11120673

AMA Style

Kambara T, Umemura T, Ackert M, Yang Y. The Relationship between Psycholinguistic Features of Religious Words and Core Dimensions of Religiosity: A Survey Study with Japanese Participants. Religions. 2020; 11(12):673. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel11120673

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kambara, Toshimune, Tomotaka Umemura, Michael Ackert, and Yutao Yang. 2020. "The Relationship between Psycholinguistic Features of Religious Words and Core Dimensions of Religiosity: A Survey Study with Japanese Participants" Religions 11, no. 12: 673. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/rel11120673

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