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Article

Facial Imitation Improves Emotion Recognition in Adults with Different Levels of Sub-Clinical Autistic Traits

by 1,2,3,*, 3 and 1,2,3,4,5,*
1
Early Support and Counselling Center Jena, Herbert Feuchte Stiftungsverbund, 07743 Jena, Germany
2
Social Potential in Autism Research Unit, Friedrich Schiller University, 07743 Jena, Germany
3
Department of General Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Am Steiger 3/Haus 1, 07743 Jena, Germany
4
Michael Stifel Center Jena for Data-Driven and Simulation Science, Friedrich Schiller University, 07743 Jena, Germany
5
Swiss Center for Affective Science, University of Geneva, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 August 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 13 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Socio-Emotional Ability Research)
We used computer-based automatic expression analysis to investigate the impact of imitation on facial emotion recognition with a baseline-intervention-retest design. The participants: 55 young adults with varying degrees of autistic traits, completed an emotion recognition task with images of faces displaying one of six basic emotional expressions. This task was then repeated with instructions to imitate the expressions. During the experiment, a camera captured the participants’ faces for an automatic evaluation of their imitation performance. The instruction to imitate enhanced imitation performance as well as emotion recognition. Of relevance, emotion recognition improvements in the imitation block were larger in people with higher levels of autistic traits, whereas imitation enhancements were independent of autistic traits. The finding that an imitation instruction improves emotion recognition, and that imitation is a positive within-participant predictor of recognition accuracy in the imitation block supports the idea of a link between motor expression and perception in the processing of emotions, which might be mediated by the mirror neuron system. However, because there was no evidence that people with higher autistic traits differ in their imitative behavior per se, their disproportional emotion recognition benefits could have arisen from indirect effects of imitation instructions View Full-Text
Keywords: emotion recognition; face; imitation; mimicry; autism; embodied cognition; facial feedback; automatic expression analysis emotion recognition; face; imitation; mimicry; autism; embodied cognition; facial feedback; automatic expression analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kowallik, A.E.; Pohl, M.; Schweinberger, S.R. Facial Imitation Improves Emotion Recognition in Adults with Different Levels of Sub-Clinical Autistic Traits. J. Intell. 2021, 9, 4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9010004

AMA Style

Kowallik AE, Pohl M, Schweinberger SR. Facial Imitation Improves Emotion Recognition in Adults with Different Levels of Sub-Clinical Autistic Traits. Journal of Intelligence. 2021; 9(1):4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kowallik, Andrea E., Maike Pohl, and Stefan R. Schweinberger 2021. "Facial Imitation Improves Emotion Recognition in Adults with Different Levels of Sub-Clinical Autistic Traits" Journal of Intelligence 9, no. 1: 4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9010004

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