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Article

Initial Evidence for the Hypersensitivity Hypothesis: Emotional Intelligence as a Magnifier of Emotional Experience

1
Swiss Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (SFIVET), 1020 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 September 2020 / Revised: 24 March 2021 / Accepted: 19 April 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Socio-Emotional Ability Research)
In this article, we provide preliminary evidence for the ‘hypersensitivity hypothesis’, according to which Emotional Intelligence (EI) functions as a magnifier of emotional experience, enhancing the effect of emotion and emotion information on thinking and social perception. Measuring ability EI, and in particular Emotion Understanding, we describe an experiment designed to determine whether, relative to those low in EI, individuals high in EI were more affected by the valence of a scenario describing a target when making an affective social judgment. Employing a sample of individuals from the general population, high EI participants were found to provide more extreme (positive or negative) impressions of the target as a function of the scenario valence: positive information about the target increased high EI participants’ positive impressions more than it increased low EI participants’ impressions, and negative information increased their negative impressions more. In addition, EI affected the amount of recalled information and this led high EI individuals to intensify their affective ratings of the target. These initial results show that individuals high on EI may be particularly sensitive to emotions and emotion information, and they suggest that this hypersensitivity might account for both the beneficial and detrimental effects of EI documented in the literature. Implications are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypersensitivity; emotional intelligence; ability EI; social perception; amplification of emotions; emotion understanding hypersensitivity; emotional intelligence; ability EI; social perception; amplification of emotions; emotion understanding
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fiori, M.; Ortony, A. Initial Evidence for the Hypersensitivity Hypothesis: Emotional Intelligence as a Magnifier of Emotional Experience. J. Intell. 2021, 9, 24. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9020024

AMA Style

Fiori M, Ortony A. Initial Evidence for the Hypersensitivity Hypothesis: Emotional Intelligence as a Magnifier of Emotional Experience. Journal of Intelligence. 2021; 9(2):24. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9020024

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fiori, Marina, and Andrew Ortony. 2021. "Initial Evidence for the Hypersensitivity Hypothesis: Emotional Intelligence as a Magnifier of Emotional Experience" Journal of Intelligence 9, no. 2: 24. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9020024

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