Previous Issue
Volume 9, September

J. Intell., Volume 9, Issue 4 (December 2021) – 2 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Editorial
From the Outgoing Editor
J. Intell. 2021, 9(4), 49; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9040049 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 140
Abstract
The Journal of Intelligence was founded in 2013, eight years ago [...] Full article
Review
Are People-Centered Intelligences Psychometrically Distinct from Thing-Centered Intelligences? A Meta-Analysis
J. Intell. 2021, 9(4), 48; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/jintelligence9040048 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 222
Abstract
The Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) or three-stratum model of intelligence envisions human intelligence as a hierarchy. General intelligence (g) is situated at the top, under which are a group of broad intelligences such as verbal, visuospatial processing, and quantitative knowledge that pertain to [...] Read more.
The Cattell–Horn–Carroll (CHC) or three-stratum model of intelligence envisions human intelligence as a hierarchy. General intelligence (g) is situated at the top, under which are a group of broad intelligences such as verbal, visuospatial processing, and quantitative knowledge that pertain to more specific areas of reasoning. Some broad intelligences are people-centered, including personal, emotional, and social intelligences; others concern reasoning about things more generally, such as visuospatial and quantitative knowledge. In the present research, we conducted a meta-analysis of 87 studies, including 2322 effect sizes, to examine the average correlation between people-to-people intelligences relative to the average correlation between people-to-thing-centered intelligences (and similar comparisons). Results clearly support the psychometric distinction between people-centered and thing-centered mental abilities. Coupled with evidence for incremental predictions from people-centered intelligences, our findings provide a secure foundation for continued research focused on people-centered mental abilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Socio-Emotional Ability Research)
Previous Issue
Back to TopTop