Next Article in Journal
Preventive Antibiotic Prescribing Habits among Professionals Dedicated to Oral Implantology: An Observational Study
Previous Article in Journal
Mortality Following Clostridioides difficile Infection in Europe: A Retrospective Multicenter Case-Control Study
Article

Microscopic Analysis of Bacterial Inoculum Effect Using Micropatterned Biochip

1
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Undergraduate School, Michigan State University, 426 Auditorium Road, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Undergraduate School, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707, Korea
3
School of Mechanical Engineering, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Albert Figueras
Received: 2 March 2021 / Revised: 10 March 2021 / Accepted: 12 March 2021 / Published: 13 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship)
Antimicrobial resistance has become a major problem in public health and clinical environments. Against this background, antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) has become necessary to cure diseases in an appropriate and timely manner as it indicates the necessary concentration of antibiotics. Recently, microfluidic based rapid AST methods using microscopic analysis have been shown to reduce the time needed for the determination of the proper antibiotics. However, owing to the inoculum effect, the accurate measurement of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) is difficult. We tested four standard bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis, against five different antibiotics: piperacillin, cefotaxime, amikacin, levofloxacin, and ampicillin. The results showed that overall, the microfluidic system has a similar inoculum effect compared to the conventional AST method. However, due to the different testing conditions and determination protocols of the growth of the microfluidic based rapid AST, a few results are not identical to the conventional methods using optical density. This result suggests that microfluidic based rapid AST methods require further research on the inoculum effect for practical use in hospitals and can then be used for effective antibiotic prescriptions. View Full-Text
Keywords: inoculum effect; image-based AST; minimal inhibitory concentration; antibiotic susceptibility testing inoculum effect; image-based AST; minimal inhibitory concentration; antibiotic susceptibility testing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hwang, J.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Choi, J. Microscopic Analysis of Bacterial Inoculum Effect Using Micropatterned Biochip. Antibiotics 2021, 10, 300. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030300

AMA Style

Hwang JH, Lee SY, Choi J. Microscopic Analysis of Bacterial Inoculum Effect Using Micropatterned Biochip. Antibiotics. 2021; 10(3):300. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030300

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hwang, Jung H., Sang Y. Lee, and Jungil Choi. 2021. "Microscopic Analysis of Bacterial Inoculum Effect Using Micropatterned Biochip" Antibiotics 10, no. 3: 300. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10030300

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop