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Article

Molecular Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Isolated from Different Sources

by 1,2 and 1,*
1
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, Korea
2
School of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Management and Technology, Lahore 54770, Pakistan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marc Maresca and Yuji Morita
Received: 26 December 2020 / Revised: 15 March 2021 / Accepted: 22 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria, 2nd Edition)
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an enteric pathogen associated with human gastroenteritis outbreaks. Extensive use of antibiotics in agriculture selects resistant bacteria that may enter the food chain and potentially causes foodborne illnesses in humans that are less likely to respond to treatment with conventional antibiotics. Due to the importance of antibiotic resistance, this study aimed to investigate the combination of phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance in STEC isolates belonging to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, O145, and O157 using disc diffusion and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. All strains were phenotypically resistant to at least one antibiotic, with 100% resistance to erythromycin, followed by gentamicin (98%), streptomycin (82%), kanamycin (76%), and ampicillin (72%). The distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the STEC strains was ampC (47%), aadA1 (70%), ere(A) (88%), blaSHV (19%), blaCMY (27%), aac(3)-I (90%), and tet(A) (35%), respectively. The results suggest that most of the strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR) and the most often observed resistant pattern was of aadA1, ere(A), and aac(3)-I genes. These findings indicate the significance of monitoring the prevalence of MDR in both animals and humans around the globe. Hence, with a better understanding of antibiotic genotypes and phenotypes among the diverse STEC strains obtained, this study could guide the administration of antimicrobial drugs in STEC infections when necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotic resistance; phenotypes; genotypes; Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli; PCR antibiotic resistance; phenotypes; genotypes; Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli; PCR
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rubab, M.; Oh, D.-H. Molecular Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Isolated from Different Sources. Antibiotics 2021, 10, 344. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040344

AMA Style

Rubab M, Oh D-H. Molecular Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Isolated from Different Sources. Antibiotics. 2021; 10(4):344. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040344

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rubab, Momna; Oh, Deog-Hwan. 2021. "Molecular Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Isolated from Different Sources" Antibiotics 10, no. 4: 344. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics10040344

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