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Article

Female Asthmatic Patients Have Higher Risk to Develop Gemifloxacin-Associated Skin Rash, Highlighting Unique Delayed Onset Characteristics

1
Department of pharmacy, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80145, Taiwan
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80145, Taiwan
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80145, Taiwan
4
Department of pathology, Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan
5
School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80145, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors had contributed this manuscript equally.
Received: 11 August 2019 / Revised: 24 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 31 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innate Antimicrobial Defense of Skin and Oral Mucosa)
Gemifloxacin is a common oral antibiotic for lower respiratory tract infection worldwide. We noticed an uncommon delayed onset skin rash in patients who received Gemifloxacin. Therefore, we retrospectively reviewed all patients who received Gemifloxacin from 1 January 2011 to 31 May 2016 in a university-affiliated hospital in Taiwan. A total of 1358 patients were enrolled, of whom 36 (2.65%) had skin eruptions. The female patients had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11–4.53, p = 0.021) of having skin eruptions. A history of asthma was also a significant risk factor (OR 2.04, 95% CI = 1.01–4.14, p = 0.043). Female asthmatic patients had the highest risk of skin eruptions (10/129, 7.2%) with an adjusted OR up to 4.45 (95% CI = 1.81–10.93, p < 0.001) compared to male and non-asthmatic patients. Of note, up to 58.3% (21/36) of the patients experienced a skin rash after they had completed and stopped Gemifloxacin. The median onset time was on the second day (ranging one to five days) after completing treatment. We reported that female asthmatic patients have the highest risk of Gemifloxacin-associated skin eruptions in Asia and that they highlighted a unique delayed onset skin rash. View Full-Text
Keywords: Gemifloxacin; adverse drug reaction; skin rash; fluoroquinolones Gemifloxacin; adverse drug reaction; skin rash; fluoroquinolones
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, C.-M.; Wei, P.-J.; Shen, Y.-T.; Chang, H.-L.; Tsai, Y.-M.; Pan, H.-F.; Chang, Y.-C.; Wei, Y.-C.; Yang, C.-J. Female Asthmatic Patients Have Higher Risk to Develop Gemifloxacin-Associated Skin Rash, Highlighting Unique Delayed Onset Characteristics. Antibiotics 2019, 8, 134. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030134

AMA Style

Wu C-M, Wei P-J, Shen Y-T, Chang H-L, Tsai Y-M, Pan H-F, Chang Y-C, Wei Y-C, Yang C-J. Female Asthmatic Patients Have Higher Risk to Develop Gemifloxacin-Associated Skin Rash, Highlighting Unique Delayed Onset Characteristics. Antibiotics. 2019; 8(3):134. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030134

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wu, Chiou-Mei; Wei, Po-Ju; Shen, Yu-Ting; Chang, Hsu-Liang; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Pan, Hung-Fang; Chang, Yong-Chieh; Wei, Yu-Ching; Yang, Chih-Jen. 2019. "Female Asthmatic Patients Have Higher Risk to Develop Gemifloxacin-Associated Skin Rash, Highlighting Unique Delayed Onset Characteristics" Antibiotics 8, no. 3: 134. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030134

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