Next Article in Journal
Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Camphorimine Complexes against Candida Strains
Next Article in Special Issue
Nursing Students’ Knowledge and Awareness of Antibiotic Use, Resistance and Stewardship: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Journal
Predictors of Appropriate Antibiotic Use in Bacteremia Patients Presenting at the Emergency Department
Previous Article in Special Issue
Antibiotic Resistance: From the Bench to Patients
Communication

Resistance Levels and Epidemiology of Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacteria in Urinary Tract Infections of Inpatients and Outpatients (RENFUTI): A 10-Year Epidemiological Snapshot

1
Department of Pharmacodynamics and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Szeged, Eötvös utca 6, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
2
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 10, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
3
Institute of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, Semmelweis utca 6, 6725 Szeged, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 August 2019 / Revised: 2 September 2019 / Accepted: 7 September 2019 / Published: 9 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: From the Bench to Patients)
Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections in the human medicine, both among outpatients and inpatients. There is an increasing appreciation for the pathogenic role of non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria (NFGNBs) in UTIs, particularly in the presence of underlying illnesses. Methods: The study was carried out using data regarding a 10-year period (2008–2017). The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method, E-tests, and broth microdilution. Results: NFGNB represented 3.46% ± 0.93% for the outpatients, while 6.43% ± 0.81% of all positive urine samples for the inpatients (p < 0.001). In both groups, Pseudomonas spp. (78.7% compared to 85.1%) and Acinetobacter spp. (19.6% compared to 10.9%), were the most prevalent. The Acinetobacter resistance levels were significantly higher in inpatients isolates (p values ranging between 0.046 and <0.001), while the differences in the resistance levels of Pseudomonas was not as pronounced. The β-lactam-resistance levels were between 15–25% and 12–28% for the Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas spp., respectively. 4.71% of Acinetobacter and 1.67% of Pseudomonas were extensively drug resistant (XDR); no colistin-resistant isolates were recovered. Conclusions: Increasing resistance levels of the Acinetobacter spp. from 2013 onward, but not in the case of the Pseudomonas spp. Although rare, the drug resistant NFGNB in UTIs present a concerning therapeutic challenge to clinicians with few therapeutic options left. View Full-Text
Keywords: urinary tract infection; UTI; antibiotic; resistance; epidemiology; non-fermenting; Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas; Stenotrophomonas urinary tract infection; UTI; antibiotic; resistance; epidemiology; non-fermenting; Acinetobacter; Pseudomonas; Stenotrophomonas
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gajdács, M.; Burián, K.; Terhes, G. Resistance Levels and Epidemiology of Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacteria in Urinary Tract Infections of Inpatients and Outpatients (RENFUTI): A 10-Year Epidemiological Snapshot. Antibiotics 2019, 8, 143. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030143

AMA Style

Gajdács M, Burián K, Terhes G. Resistance Levels and Epidemiology of Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacteria in Urinary Tract Infections of Inpatients and Outpatients (RENFUTI): A 10-Year Epidemiological Snapshot. Antibiotics. 2019; 8(3):143. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030143

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gajdács, Márió, Katalin Burián, and Gabriella Terhes. 2019. "Resistance Levels and Epidemiology of Non-Fermenting Gram-Negative Bacteria in Urinary Tract Infections of Inpatients and Outpatients (RENFUTI): A 10-Year Epidemiological Snapshot" Antibiotics 8, no. 3: 143. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics8030143

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop