Next Article in Journal
Role of Artificial Intelligence in Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance in Pediatrics
Next Article in Special Issue
Honey: Another Alternative in the Fight against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria?
Previous Article in Journal
Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Essential Oils against Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from Human Semen
Previous Article in Special Issue
Synergistic Effect of Propolis and Antibiotics on Uropathogenic Escherichia coli
Review

Clinical Significance of Manuka and Medical-Grade Honey for Antibiotic-Resistant Infections: A Systematic Review

1
College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK
2
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Great Western Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Swindon SN3 6BB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 29 October 2020 / Accepted: 30 October 2020 / Published: 31 October 2020
Antimicrobial resistance is an ever-increasing global issue that has the potential to overtake cancer as the leading cause of death worldwide by 2050. With the passing of the “golden age” of antibiotic discovery, identifying alternative treatments to commonly used antimicrobials is more important than ever. Honey has been used as a topical wound treatment for millennia and more recently has been formulated into a series of medical-grade honeys for use primarily for wound and burn treatment. In this systematic review, we examined the effectiveness of differing honeys as an antimicrobial treatment against a variety of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial species. We analysed 16 original research articles that included a total of 18 different types of honey against 32 different bacterial species, including numerous MDR strains. We identified that Surgihoney was the most effective honey, displaying minimum inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.1% (w/v); however, all honeys reviewed showed a high efficacy against most bacterial species analysed. Importantly, the MDR status of each bacterial strain had no impact on the susceptibility of the organism to honey. Hence, the use of honey as an antimicrobial therapy should be considered as an alternative approach for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: honey; Manuka honey; medical-grade honey; antibiotic resistance honey; Manuka honey; medical-grade honey; antibiotic resistance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nolan, V.C.; Harrison, J.; Wright, J.E.E.; Cox, J.A.G. Clinical Significance of Manuka and Medical-Grade Honey for Antibiotic-Resistant Infections: A Systematic Review. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 766. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9110766

AMA Style

Nolan VC, Harrison J, Wright JEE, Cox JAG. Clinical Significance of Manuka and Medical-Grade Honey for Antibiotic-Resistant Infections: A Systematic Review. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(11):766. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9110766

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nolan, Victoria C., James Harrison, John E.E. Wright, and Jonathan A.G. Cox 2020. "Clinical Significance of Manuka and Medical-Grade Honey for Antibiotic-Resistant Infections: A Systematic Review" Antibiotics 9, no. 11: 766. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9110766

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop