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Article

Peer-Education as a Tool to Educate on Antibiotics, Resistance and Use in 16–18-Year-Olds: A Feasibility Study

1
Primary Care and Interventions Unit, Public Health England, Gloucester GL1 1DQ, UK
2
Division of Population Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK
3
Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
4
Division of Pharmacy & Optometry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
5
Statistics, Modelling and Economics Department, Public Health England, London NW9 5EQ, UK
6
School of Primary Care, Population Sciences and Medical Education, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 30 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Stewardship in Primary Care)
Peer education (PE) interventions may help improve knowledge and appropriate use of antibiotics in young adults. In this feasibility study, health-care students were trained to educate 16–18 years old biology students, who then educated their non-biology peers, using e-Bug antibiotic lessons. Knowledge was assessed by questionnaires, and antibiotic use by questionnaire, SMS messaging and GP record searches. Five of 17 schools approached participated (3 PE and 2 control (usual lessons)). 59% (10/17) of university students and 28% (15/54) of biology students volunteered as peer-educators. PE was well-received; 30% (38/127) intervention students and 55% (66/120) control students completed all questionnaires. Antibiotic use from GP medical records (54/136, 40% of students’ data available), student SMS (69/136, 51% replied) and questionnaire (109/136, 80% completed) data showed good agreement between GP and SMS (kappa = 0.72), but poor agreement between GP and questionnaires (kappa = 0.06). Median knowledge scores were higher post-intervention, with greater improvement for non-biology students. Delivering and evaluating e-Bug PE is feasible with supportive school staff. Single tiered PE by university students may be easier to regulate and manage due to time constraints on school students. SMS collection of antibiotic data is easier and has similar accuracy to GP data. View Full-Text
Keywords: peer education; biology; students; antibiotics; antibiotic resistance; health education peer education; biology; students; antibiotics; antibiotic resistance; health education
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MDPI and ACS Style

McNulty, C.A.M.; Syeda, R.B.; Brown, C.L.; Bennett, C.V.; Schofield, B.; Allison, D.G.; Verlander, N.Q.; Francis, N. Peer-Education as a Tool to Educate on Antibiotics, Resistance and Use in 16–18-Year-Olds: A Feasibility Study. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 146. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9040146

AMA Style

McNulty CAM, Syeda RB, Brown CL, Bennett CV, Schofield B, Allison DG, Verlander NQ, Francis N. Peer-Education as a Tool to Educate on Antibiotics, Resistance and Use in 16–18-Year-Olds: A Feasibility Study. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(4):146. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9040146

Chicago/Turabian Style

McNulty, Cliodna A.M., Rowshonara B. Syeda, Carla L. Brown, C. V. Bennett, Behnaz Schofield, David G. Allison, Neville Q. Verlander, and Nick Francis. 2020. "Peer-Education as a Tool to Educate on Antibiotics, Resistance and Use in 16–18-Year-Olds: A Feasibility Study" Antibiotics 9, no. 4: 146. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9040146

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