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Open AccessPerspective

Optimizing Anti-Viral Vaccine Responses: Input from a Non-Specialist

Department of Biochemistry and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA
Received: 27 April 2020 / Revised: 12 May 2020 / Accepted: 13 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phage Diversity for Research and Application)
Recently, the research community has had a real-world look at reasons for improving vaccine responses to emerging RNA viruses. Here, a vaccine non-specialist suggests how this might be done. I propose two alternative options and compare the primary alternative option with current practice. The basis of comparison is feasibility in achieving what we need: a safe, mass-produced, emerging virus-targeted vaccine on 2–4 week notice. The primary option is the following. (1) Start with a platform based on live viruses that infect bacteria, but not humans (bacteriophages, or phages). (2) Isolate phages (to be called pathogen homologs) that resemble and provide antigenic context for membrane-covered, pathogenic RNA viruses; coronavirus-phage homologs will probably be found if the search is correctly done. (3) Upon isolating a viral pathogen, evolve its phage homolog to bind antibodies neutralizing for the viral pathogen. Vaccinate with the evolved phage homolog by generating a local, non-hazardous infection with the phage host and then curing the infection by propagating the phage in the artificially infecting bacterial host. I discuss how this alternative option has the potential to provide what is needed after appropriate platforms are built. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacteriophage; coronavirus; directed evolution; emerging viral pathogen; vaccine bacteriophage; coronavirus; directed evolution; emerging viral pathogen; vaccine
MDPI and ACS Style

Serwer, P. Optimizing Anti-Viral Vaccine Responses: Input from a Non-Specialist. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 255. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9050255

AMA Style

Serwer P. Optimizing Anti-Viral Vaccine Responses: Input from a Non-Specialist. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(5):255. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9050255

Chicago/Turabian Style

Serwer, Philip. 2020. "Optimizing Anti-Viral Vaccine Responses: Input from a Non-Specialist" Antibiotics 9, no. 5: 255. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9050255

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