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Article

The pathogen Mycoplasma dispar Shows High Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Antimicrobials Commonly Used for Bovine Respiratory Disease

1
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, SCT1-Verona, 37135 Verona, Italy
2
The Oaks, Nutshell Lane, Upper Hale, Farnham, Surrey GU9 0HG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 June 2020 / Revised: 10 July 2020 / Accepted: 25 July 2020 / Published: 29 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance in Pathogens Isolated from Animals)
Mycoplasma dispar is an overlooked pathogen often involved in bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which affects cattle around the world. BRD results in lost production and high treatment and prevention costs. Additionally, chronic therapies with multiple antimicrobials may lead to antimicrobial resistance. Data on antimicrobial susceptibility to M. dispar is limited so minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of a range of antimicrobials routinely used in BRD were evaluated using a broth microdilution technique for 41 M. dispar isolates collected in Italy between 2011–2019. While all isolates had low MIC values for florfenicol (<1 μg/mL), many showed high MIC values for erythromycin (MIC90 ≥8 μg/mL). Tilmicosin MIC values were higher (MIC50 = 32 μg/mL) than those for tylosin (MIC50 = 0.25 μg/mL). Seven isolates had high MIC values for lincomycin, tilmicosin and tylosin (≥32 μg/mL). More, alarmingly, results showed more than half the strains had high MICs for enrofloxacin, a member of the fluoroquinolone class considered critically important in human health. A time-dependent progressive drift of enrofloxacin MICs towards high-concentration values was observed, indicative of an on-going selection process among the isolates. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mycoplasma dispar; minimum inhibitory concentration; antibiotic resistance; bovine respiratory disease Mycoplasma dispar; minimum inhibitory concentration; antibiotic resistance; bovine respiratory disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bottinelli, M.; Merenda, M.; Gastaldelli, M.; Picchi, M.; Stefani, E.; Nicholas, R.A.J.; Catania, S. The pathogen Mycoplasma dispar Shows High Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Antimicrobials Commonly Used for Bovine Respiratory Disease. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 460. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9080460

AMA Style

Bottinelli M, Merenda M, Gastaldelli M, Picchi M, Stefani E, Nicholas RAJ, Catania S. The pathogen Mycoplasma dispar Shows High Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Antimicrobials Commonly Used for Bovine Respiratory Disease. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(8):460. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9080460

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bottinelli, Marco; Merenda, Marianna; Gastaldelli, Michele; Picchi, Micaela; Stefani, Elisabetta; Nicholas, Robin A.J.; Catania, Salvatore. 2020. "The pathogen Mycoplasma dispar Shows High Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Antimicrobials Commonly Used for Bovine Respiratory Disease" Antibiotics 9, no. 8: 460. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/antibiotics9080460

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