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Review

Selection of Industrial Trade Waste Resource Recovery Technologies—A Systematic Review

ARC Training Centre for the Transformation of Australia’s Biosolids Resource, RMIT University, Bundoora 3083, Australia
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Academic Editors: Daniel Puyol and Angel Fernández Mohedano
Received: 29 January 2021 / Revised: 24 March 2021 / Accepted: 26 March 2021 / Published: 29 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resource Recovery from Wastewater)
Industrial wastewater and other trade wastes are often sources of pollution which can cause environmental damage. However, resource recovery approaches have the potential to lead to positive environmental outcomes, profits, and new sources of finite commodities. Information on these waste sources, and the valuable components which may be contained in such waste is increasingly being made available by public, academic and commercial stakeholders (including companies active in meat processing, dairy, brewing, textile and other sectors). Utilising academic and industry literature, this review evaluates several methods of resource recovery (e.g., bioreactors, membrane technologies, and traditional chemical processes) and their advantages and disadvantages in a trade waste setting. This review lays the groundwork for classification of waste and resource recovery technologies, in order to inform process choices, which may lead to wider commercial application of these technologies. Although each waste source and recovery process is unique, membrane bioreactors show promise for a wide range of resource recovery applications. Despite interest, uptake of resource recovery technologies remains low, or not widely championed. For this to change, knowledge needs to increase in several key areas including: availabilities and classification of trade wastes, technology choice processes, and industrial viability. View Full-Text
Keywords: resource recovery; trade waste; industrial wastewater; biogas; struvite; membrane resource recovery; trade waste; industrial wastewater; biogas; struvite; membrane
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MDPI and ACS Style

Elliott, J.A.K.; Ball, A.S. Selection of Industrial Trade Waste Resource Recovery Technologies—A Systematic Review. Resources 2021, 10, 29. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10040029

AMA Style

Elliott JAK, Ball AS. Selection of Industrial Trade Waste Resource Recovery Technologies—A Systematic Review. Resources. 2021; 10(4):29. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10040029

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elliott, Jake A.K., and Andrew S. Ball. 2021. "Selection of Industrial Trade Waste Resource Recovery Technologies—A Systematic Review" Resources 10, no. 4: 29. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10040029

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