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Article

CC(U)S Initiatives: Public Effects and “Combined Value” Performance

Economics, Organization and Management Department, Saint-Petersburg Mining University, 199106 Saint-Petersburg, Russia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Witold-Roger Poganietz and Ben McLellan
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 22 April 2021 / Accepted: 3 June 2021 / Published: 8 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewables Application: Challenges and Perspectives)
The changes in climate, which are associated with the emission of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, have been widely discussed by scientists and specialists during the last few decades. The promising way to reduce CO2 emission is to implement CC(U)S technologies (carbon capture, (utilization) and storage). However, CC(U)S initiatives are challenging that prevent their widespread adoption. The main purpose of the research is to prove that CC(U)S should be considered broader than a way to reduce emission, and such initiatives could lead to various public effects and create long-term “combined value” for the industry and wider society; all of these should be considered when making decisions on CC(U)S implementation. The results of the research are presented by highlighting bi-directional interaction between CC(U)S and society, including public acceptance and public effects; identifying the possible positive and negative impact of CC(U)S initiatives on the public; developing a system of indicators for assessing the public effects of CC(U)S; proposing the framework for a value at stake analysis (VAS) of CC(U)S initiatives in order to reveal and assess their “combined value”. The methodology of this study includes desk studies, decomposition technique, environment (E), health (H) and safety (S) (EHS) approach, classification techniques, and VAS analysis. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; CO2 emission; CC(U)S initiatives; project; public effects; society; system of indicators; assessment; value; combined value climate change; CO2 emission; CC(U)S initiatives; project; public effects; society; system of indicators; assessment; value; combined value
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ilinova, A.; Romasheva, N.; Cherepovitsyn, A. CC(U)S Initiatives: Public Effects and “Combined Value” Performance. Resources 2021, 10, 61. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10060061

AMA Style

Ilinova A, Romasheva N, Cherepovitsyn A. CC(U)S Initiatives: Public Effects and “Combined Value” Performance. Resources. 2021; 10(6):61. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10060061

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ilinova, Alina, Natalia Romasheva, and Alexey Cherepovitsyn. 2021. "CC(U)S Initiatives: Public Effects and “Combined Value” Performance" Resources 10, no. 6: 61. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/resources10060061

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