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Brief Report

Evaluation of Plasma Circulating Cell Free DNA Concentration and Integrity in Patients with Prostate Cancer in Jamaica: A Preliminary Study

1
Department of Basic Medical Sciences (Pharmacology Section), Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica
2
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica
3
Department of Surgery, Radiology, Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Section of Surgery, Urology Division, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica
4
Department of Basic Medical Sciences (Molecular Biology Section), Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 August 2020 / Revised: 4 September 2020 / Accepted: 5 September 2020 / Published: 7 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic and Infectious Diseases)
Background: Cell free circulating DNA (cfcDNA) is a promising diagnostic tool for prostate cancer (PCa). This study aimed to measure the cfcDNA concentration and integrity in PCa patients using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. This study also assessed the correlation between these molecular biomarkers with total prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, prostate volume, and age. Methods: Eleven PCa patients and 9 persons with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were recruited. Blood samples were collected before prostate biopsy and plasma quantified by qPCR amplification of the ALU 115 DNA sequence, with the ratio of ALU 247 to ALU 115 reflecting cfcDNA integrity. Results: There were no significant differences in median, interquartile range (IQR) cfcDNA concentration or cfcDNA integrity between the patients with PCa (47.9 (214.93) ng/mL; 0.61 (0.49)) and persons with BPH (41.5 (55.13) ng/mL, p = 0.382; 0.67 (0.45), p = 0.342). A weakly positive correlation exists between cfcDNA concentration and total PSA (r = 0.200, p = 0.555) but not with age or Gleason score in PCa patients. Conclusion: cfcDNA concentration was relatively nonsignificantly higher in PCa patients in comparison to persons with BPH, whereas cfcDNA integrity was similar in both groups. Though limited in sample size, this study shows that cfcDNA concentration may be a potentially valuable noninvasive biomarker for the diagnosis of PCa. View Full-Text
Keywords: cell free; circulating DNA; prostate; cancer; integrity cell free; circulating DNA; prostate; cancer; integrity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Condappa, A.; McGrowder, D.; Aiken, W.; McLaughlin, W.; Gossell-Williams, M. Evaluation of Plasma Circulating Cell Free DNA Concentration and Integrity in Patients with Prostate Cancer in Jamaica: A Preliminary Study. Diseases 2020, 8, 34. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases8030034

AMA Style

Condappa A, McGrowder D, Aiken W, McLaughlin W, Gossell-Williams M. Evaluation of Plasma Circulating Cell Free DNA Concentration and Integrity in Patients with Prostate Cancer in Jamaica: A Preliminary Study. Diseases. 2020; 8(3):34. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases8030034

Chicago/Turabian Style

Condappa, Andrew, Donovan McGrowder, William Aiken, Wayne McLaughlin, and Maxine Gossell-Williams. 2020. "Evaluation of Plasma Circulating Cell Free DNA Concentration and Integrity in Patients with Prostate Cancer in Jamaica: A Preliminary Study" Diseases 8, no. 3: 34. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/diseases8030034

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