Next Article in Journal
The Potential of LiDAR and UAV-Photogrammetric Data Analysis to Interpret Archaeological Sites: A Case Study of Chun Castle in South-West England
Previous Article in Journal
FuNet: A Novel Road Extraction Network with Fusion of Location Data and Remote Sensing Imagery
Article

Traffic Inequality and Relations in Maritime Silk Road: A Network Flow Analysis

1
College of Geodesy and Geomatics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, China
2
National-Local Joint Engineering Research Center for Marine Navigation Aids Services, Navigation College, Jimei University, Xiamen 361021, China
3
Key Laboratory for Synergistic Prevention of Water and Soil Environmental Pollution, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464099, China
4
Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(1), 40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010040
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 11 January 2021 / Accepted: 16 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
Maritime traffic can reflect the diverse and complex relations between countries and regions, such as economic trade and geopolitics. Based on the AIS (Automatic Identification System) trajectory data of ships, this study constructs the Maritime Silk Road traffic network. In this study, we used a complex network theory along with social network analysis and network flow analysis to analyze the spatial distribution characteristics of maritime traffic flow of the Maritime Silk Road; further, we empirically demonstrate the traffic inequality in the route. On this basis, we explore the role of the country in the maritime traffic system and the resulting traffic relations. There are three main results of this study. (1) The inequality in the maritime traffic of the Maritime Silk Road has led to obvious regional differences. Europe, west Asia, northeast Asia, and southeast Asia are the dominant regions of the Maritime Silk Road. (2) Different countries play different maritime traffic roles. Italy, Singapore, and China are the core countries in the maritime traffic network of the Maritime Silk Road; Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Lebanon, and Israel have built a structure of maritime traffic flow in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, and Saudi Arabia serves as a bridge for maritime trade between Asia and Europe. (3) The maritime traffic relations show the characteristics of regionalization; countries in west Asia and the European Mediterranean region are clearly polarized, and competition–synergy relations have become the main form of maritime traffic relations among the countries in the dominant regions. Our results can provide a scientific reference for the coordinated development of regional shipping, improvement of maritime competition, cooperation strategies for countries, and adjustments in the organizational structure of ports along the Maritime Silk Road. View Full-Text
Keywords: traffic flow; traffic inequality; traffic relations; Maritime Silk Road; network flow analysis traffic flow; traffic inequality; traffic relations; Maritime Silk Road; network flow analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mou, N.; Ren, H.; Zheng, Y.; Chen, J.; Niu, J.; Yang, T.; Zhang, L.; Liu, F. Traffic Inequality and Relations in Maritime Silk Road: A Network Flow Analysis. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010040

AMA Style

Mou N, Ren H, Zheng Y, Chen J, Niu J, Yang T, Zhang L, Liu F. Traffic Inequality and Relations in Maritime Silk Road: A Network Flow Analysis. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(1):40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010040

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mou, Naixia, Haonan Ren, Yunhao Zheng, Jinhai Chen, Jiqiang Niu, Tengfei Yang, Lingxian Zhang, and Feng Liu. 2021. "Traffic Inequality and Relations in Maritime Silk Road: A Network Flow Analysis" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 1: 40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10010040

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop