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Article

Spatial Variability of Rainfall Trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to 2019 as an Indication of Climate Change

1
Department of Physics, University of Colombo, Colombo 00300, Sri Lanka
2
International Water Management Institute (IWMI), 127, Sunil Mawatha, Pelawatte, Colombo 10120, Sri Lanka
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wolfgang Kainz
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(2), 84; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020084
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 6 February 2021 / Accepted: 18 February 2021 / Published: 19 February 2021
Analysis of long-term rainfall trends provides a wealth of information on effective crop planning and water resource management, and a better understanding of climate variability over time. This study reveals the spatial variability of rainfall trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to 2019 as an indication of climate change. The exclusivity of the study is the use of rainfall data that provide spatial variability instead of the traditional location-based approach. Henceforth, daily rainfall data available at Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation corrected with stations (CHIRPS) data were used for this study. The geographic information system (GIS) is used to perform spatial data analysis on both vector and raster data. Sen’s slope estimator and the Mann–Kendall (M–K) test are used to investigate the trends in annual and seasonal rainfall throughout all districts and climatic zones of Sri Lanka. The most important thing reflected in this study is that there has been a significant increase in annual rainfall from 1989 to 2019 in all climatic zones (wet, dry, intermediate, and Semi-arid) of Sri Lanka. The maximum increase is recorded in the wet zone and the minimum increase is in the semi-arid zone. There could be an increased risk of floods in the southern and western provinces in the future, whereas areas in the eastern and southeastern districts may face severe droughts during the northeastern monsoon. It is advisable to introduce effective drought and flood management and preparedness measures to reduce the respective hazard risk levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: CHIRPS data; climate change; climate hazards; climate zone; natural hazards; Mann–Kendall test; rainfall; rainfall trend; Sen’s slope estimator; Sri Lanka CHIRPS data; climate change; climate hazards; climate zone; natural hazards; Mann–Kendall test; rainfall; rainfall trend; Sen’s slope estimator; Sri Lanka
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alahacoon, N.; Edirisinghe, M. Spatial Variability of Rainfall Trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to 2019 as an Indication of Climate Change. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 84. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020084

AMA Style

Alahacoon N, Edirisinghe M. Spatial Variability of Rainfall Trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to 2019 as an Indication of Climate Change. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(2):84. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020084

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alahacoon, Niranga, and Mahesh Edirisinghe. 2021. "Spatial Variability of Rainfall Trends in Sri Lanka from 1989 to 2019 as an Indication of Climate Change" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 2: 84. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020084

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