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Review

Geoinformation Technologies in Support of Environmental Hazards Monitoring under Climate Change: An Extensive Review

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Department of Surveying and Geoinformatics Engineering, University of West Attica, Ag. Spyridonos Str., Egaleo, 12243 Athens, Greece
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Department of Geography, Harokopio University of Athens, El. Venizelou St., 70, Kallithea, 17671 Athens, Greece
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Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, BEYOND Centre of EO Research & Satellite Remote Sensing,15236 Athens, Greece
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Laboratory Mineralogy-Geology, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
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Laboratory of Agricultural Hydraulics, Division of Water Resources, Department of Natural Resources Development and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
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Laboratory of Technology and Policy of Energy and Environment, School of Science and Technology, Hellenic Open University Parodos Aristotelous 18, 26335 Patra, Greece
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Department of Architecture, University of Patras, University Campus, Rio, 26500 Patra, Greece
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wolfgang Kainz
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(2), 94; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020094
Received: 17 January 2021 / Accepted: 16 February 2021 / Published: 21 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS-Based Analysis for Quality of Life and Environmental Monitoring)
Human activities and climate change constitute the contemporary catalyst for natural processes and their impacts, i.e., geo-environmental hazards. Globally, natural catastrophic phenomena and hazards, such as drought, soil erosion, quantitative and qualitative degradation of groundwater, frost, flooding, sea level rise, etc., are intensified by anthropogenic factors. Thus, they present rapid increase in intensity, frequency of occurrence, spatial density, and significant spread of the areas of occurrence. The impact of these phenomena is devastating to human life and to global economies, private holdings, infrastructure, etc., while in a wider context it has a very negative effect on the social, environmental, and economic status of the affected region. Geospatial technologies including Geographic Information Systems, Remote Sensing—Earth Observation as well as related spatial data analysis tools, models, databases, contribute nowadays significantly in predicting, preventing, researching, addressing, rehabilitating, and managing these phenomena and their effects. This review attempts to mark the most devastating geo-hazards from the view of environmental monitoring, covering the state of the art in the use of geospatial technologies in that respect. It also defines the main challenge of this new era which is nothing more than the fictitious exploitation of the information produced by the environmental monitoring so that the necessary policies are taken in the direction of a sustainable future. The review highlights the potential and increasing added value of geographic information as a means to support environmental monitoring in the face of climate change. The growth in geographic information seems to be rapidly accelerated due to the technological and scientific developments that will continue with exponential progress in the years to come. Nonetheless, as it is also highlighted in this review continuous monitoring of the environment is subject to an interdisciplinary approach and contains an amount of actions that cover both the development of natural phenomena and their catastrophic effects mostly due to climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental monitoring; climate change; geohazards; geoinformation; geographical information systems; earth observation environmental monitoring; climate change; geohazards; geoinformation; geographical information systems; earth observation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tsatsaris, A.; Kalogeropoulos, K.; Stathopoulos, N.; Louka, P.; Tsanakas, K.; Tsesmelis, D.E.; Krassanakis, V.; Petropoulos, G.P.; Pappas, V.; Chalkias, C. Geoinformation Technologies in Support of Environmental Hazards Monitoring under Climate Change: An Extensive Review. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 94. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020094

AMA Style

Tsatsaris A, Kalogeropoulos K, Stathopoulos N, Louka P, Tsanakas K, Tsesmelis DE, Krassanakis V, Petropoulos GP, Pappas V, Chalkias C. Geoinformation Technologies in Support of Environmental Hazards Monitoring under Climate Change: An Extensive Review. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(2):94. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020094

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tsatsaris, Andreas, Kleomenis Kalogeropoulos, Nikolaos Stathopoulos, Panagiota Louka, Konstantinos Tsanakas, Demetrios E. Tsesmelis, Vassilios Krassanakis, George P. Petropoulos, Vasilis Pappas, and Christos Chalkias. 2021. "Geoinformation Technologies in Support of Environmental Hazards Monitoring under Climate Change: An Extensive Review" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 2: 94. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi10020094

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