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Article

The City of Tomorrow from… the Data of Today

1
3D Geoinformation group, Department of Urbanism, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 134, 2628BL Delft, The Netherlands
2
Department of Urbanism, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 134, 2628BL Delft, The Netherlands
3
Architectural Design Crossovers group, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 134, 2628BL Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(9), 554; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9090554
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 13 September 2020 / Published: 16 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Applications of 3D-City Models in Urban Studies)
In urban planning, a common unit of measure for housing density is the number of households per hectare. However, the actual size of the physical space occupied by a household, i.e., a dwelling, is seldom considered, neither in 2D nor in 3D. This article proposes a methodology to estimate the average size of a dwelling in existing urban areas from available open data, and to use it as one of the design parameters for new urban-development projects. The proposed unit of measure, called “living space”, includes outdoor and indoor spaces. The idea is to quantitatively analyze the city of today to help design the city of tomorrow. First, the “typical”-dwelling size and a series of Key Performance Indicators are computed for all neighborhoods from a semantic 3D city model and other spatial and non-spatial datasets. A limited number of neighborhoods is selected based on their similarities with the envisioned development plan. The size of the living space of the selected neighborhoods is successively used as a design parameter to support the computer-assisted generation of several design proposals. Each proposal can be exported, shared, and visualized online. As a test case, a to-be-planned neighborhood in Amsterdam, called “Sloterdijk One”, has been chosen. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban planning; virtual city models; parametric design; CityGML; living space; Grasshopper urban planning; virtual city models; parametric design; CityGML; living space; Grasshopper
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MDPI and ACS Style

Agugiaro, G.; González, F.G.G.; Cavallo, R. The City of Tomorrow from… the Data of Today. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9, 554. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9090554

AMA Style

Agugiaro G, González FGG, Cavallo R. The City of Tomorrow from… the Data of Today. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2020; 9(9):554. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9090554

Chicago/Turabian Style

Agugiaro, Giorgio; González, Francisco G.G.; Cavallo, Roberto. 2020. "The City of Tomorrow from… the Data of Today" ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 9, no. 9: 554. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijgi9090554

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