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How Do the Cultural Dimensions of Climate Shape Our Understanding of Climate Change?

1
Alexandra and Associates, 16 Homestead Road Eltham, Melbourne, VIC 3095, Australia
2
School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
Academic Editors: Steven McNulty and Thomas Beery
Received: 28 February 2021 / Revised: 6 April 2021 / Accepted: 8 April 2021 / Published: 10 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthropogenic Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives)
Climatic events express the dynamics of the Earth’s oceans and atmosphere, but are profoundly personal and social in their impacts, representation and comprehension. This paper explores how knowledge of the climate has multiple scales and dimensions that intersect in our experience of the climate. The climate is objective and subjective, scientific and cultural, local and global, and personal and political. These divergent dimensions of the climate frame the philosophical and cultural challenges of a dynamic climate. Drawing on research into the adaptation in Australia’s Murray Darling Basin, this paper outlines the significance of understanding the cultural dimensions of the changing climate. This paper argues for greater recognition of the ways in which cultures co-create the climate and, therefore, that the climate needs to be recognised as a socio-natural hybrid. Given the climate’s hybrid nature, research should aim to integrate our understanding of the social and the natural dimensions of our relationships to a changing climate. View Full-Text
Keywords: critical realism; cultural adaptation; custodial ethics; socio-natural hybrids; knowledge politics; climate subjectivities; climate co-production critical realism; cultural adaptation; custodial ethics; socio-natural hybrids; knowledge politics; climate subjectivities; climate co-production
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alexandra, J. How Do the Cultural Dimensions of Climate Shape Our Understanding of Climate Change? Climate 2021, 9, 63. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli9040063

AMA Style

Alexandra J. How Do the Cultural Dimensions of Climate Shape Our Understanding of Climate Change? Climate. 2021; 9(4):63. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli9040063

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alexandra, Jason. 2021. "How Do the Cultural Dimensions of Climate Shape Our Understanding of Climate Change?" Climate 9, no. 4: 63. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/cli9040063

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