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Article

Optimizing Dietary Habits in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Personalized Mediterranean Diet Intervention via Clinical Decision Support System—A Randomized Controlled Trial

by
Alexandra Foscolou
1,
Panos Papandreou
2,
Aristea Gioxari
1,* and
Maria Skouroliakou
3
1
Department of Nutritional Science and Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, 24100 Kalamata, Greece
2
Department of Nutrition, IASO Hospital, 37-39 Kifissias Ave., 15123 Athens, Greece
3
Department of Dietetics and Nutritional Science, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Ave., 17676 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Submission received: 23 April 2024 / Revised: 14 May 2024 / Accepted: 23 May 2024 / Published: 24 May 2024

Abstract

The hypothesis of this randomized controlled trial was that a clinical decision support system (CDSS) would increase adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) among adolescent females with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective was to assess the impact of personalized MD plans delivered via a CDSS on nutritional status and psychological well-being. Forty adolescent females (15–17 years) with PCOS were randomly assigned to the MD group (n = 20) or the Control group (n = 20). The MD group received personalized MD plans every 15 days via a CDSS, while the Control group received general nutritional advice. Assessments were conducted at baseline and after 3 months. Results showed significantly increased MD adherence in the MD group compared to the Control group (p < 0.001). The MD group exhibited lower intakes of energy, total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and higher intakes of monounsaturated fat and fiber (p < 0.05). Serum calcium and vitamin D status (p < 0.05), as well as anxiety (p < 0.05) were improved. In conclusion, tailored dietary interventions based on MD principles, delivered via a CDSS, effectively manage PCOS in adolescent females. These findings highlight the potential benefits of using technology to promote dietary adherence and improve health outcomes in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov registry: NCT06380010.
Keywords: polycystic ovary syndrome; clinical decision support system; adolescents; females; Mediterranean diet; anxiety polycystic ovary syndrome; clinical decision support system; adolescents; females; Mediterranean diet; anxiety

Share and Cite

MDPI and ACS Style

Foscolou, A.; Papandreou, P.; Gioxari, A.; Skouroliakou, M. Optimizing Dietary Habits in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Personalized Mediterranean Diet Intervention via Clinical Decision Support System—A Randomized Controlled Trial. Children 2024, 11, 635. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060635

AMA Style

Foscolou A, Papandreou P, Gioxari A, Skouroliakou M. Optimizing Dietary Habits in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Personalized Mediterranean Diet Intervention via Clinical Decision Support System—A Randomized Controlled Trial. Children. 2024; 11(6):635. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060635

Chicago/Turabian Style

Foscolou, Alexandra, Panos Papandreou, Aristea Gioxari, and Maria Skouroliakou. 2024. "Optimizing Dietary Habits in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Personalized Mediterranean Diet Intervention via Clinical Decision Support System—A Randomized Controlled Trial" Children 11, no. 6: 635. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children11060635

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