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Article

School Bag Weight as a Barrier to Active Transport to School among New Zealand Adolescents

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Active Living Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
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Department of Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
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Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Education and Health Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
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School of Surveying, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2018, 5(10), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/children5100129
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 17 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Children and Adolescents)
Background: Excessive school bag weight is a barrier to active transport to school (ATS). This study examined parents’ and adolescents’ perceptions of school bag weights and actual school bag weights for adolescents in New Zealand. Methods: Parents (n = 331; 76.7% women) completed a survey. Adolescents (n = 682; age 15.1 ± 1.4 years; 57.3% boys) completed a survey, underwent anthropometry, and had their school bags weighed. Results: Overall, 68.3% of parents perceived that adolescents’ school bags were too heavy to carry to school. This parental perception differed by adolescents’ mode of transport to school (active/motorized/combined: 35.1%/78.4%/68.8%, p < 0.001). Adolescents perceived that their school bags were too heavy to carry to walk (57.8%) or cycle (65.8%) to school. Adolescent perceptions differed by mode of transport to school (for walking (active/motorized/combined): 30.9%/69.2%/55.9% agree, p < 0.001; for cycling: 47.9%/72.8%/67.7%; p < 0.001). Actual school bag weight was, on average, 5.6 ± 2.1 kg. Relative school bag weight (% of body weight) was higher for boys and underweight adolescents compared to their counterparts. Neither absolute nor relative school bag weight differed by mode of transport to school. Conclusions: School bag weight was perceived a barrier to ATS and was a greater perceived barrier among users of motorized versus active transport. Perceptions of school bag weights should be considered in future ATS interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Active transport; school; school bag; adolescents; parents Active transport; school; school bag; adolescents; parents
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mandic, S.; Keller, R.; García Bengoechea, E.; Moore, A.; Coppell, K.J. School Bag Weight as a Barrier to Active Transport to School among New Zealand Adolescents. Children 2018, 5, 129. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children5100129

AMA Style

Mandic S, Keller R, García Bengoechea E, Moore A, Coppell KJ. School Bag Weight as a Barrier to Active Transport to School among New Zealand Adolescents. Children. 2018; 5(10):129. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children5100129

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mandic, Sandra, Roman Keller, Enrique García Bengoechea, Antoni Moore, and Kirsten J. Coppell. 2018. "School Bag Weight as a Barrier to Active Transport to School among New Zealand Adolescents" Children 5, no. 10: 129. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children5100129

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