Next Article in Journal
Successful Use of Multidisciplinary Palliative Care in the Outpatient Treatment of Disseminated Histoplasmosis in an HIV Positive Child
Next Article in Special Issue
Molecular Mechanisms of Maternal Diabetes Effects on Fetal and Neonatal Surfactant
Previous Article in Journal
Modesty and Security: Attributes Associated with Comfort and Willingness to Engage in Telelactation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Examining Variations in Surfactant Administration (ENVISION): A Neonatology Insights Pilot Project
Review

Antenatal Corticosteroids: Extending the Practice for Late-Preterm and Scheduled Early-Term Deliveries?

1
Division of Neonatology, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA
3
Department of Pharmacy, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Rita Marie Ryan
Received: 15 February 2021 / Revised: 29 March 2021 / Accepted: 29 March 2021 / Published: 1 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neonatal Respiratory Distress)
Respiratory distress in late-preterm and early term infants generally may warrant admission to a special care nursery or an intensive care unit. In particular, respiratory distress syndrome and transient tachypnea of the newborn are the two most common respiratory morbidities. Antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) facilitate surfactant production and lung fluid resorption. The use of ACS has been proven to be beneficial for preterm infants delivered at less than 34 weeks’ gestation. Literature suggests that the benefits of giving antenatal corticosteroids may extend to late-preterm and early term infants as well. This review discusses the short-term benefits of ACS administration in reducing respiratory morbidities, in addition to potential long term adverse effects. An update on the current practices of ACS use in pregnancies greater than 34 weeks’ gestation and considerations of possibly extending versus restricting this practice to certain settings will also be provided. View Full-Text
Keywords: antenatal corticosteroids; late-preterm; early term; caesarean delivery; RDS antenatal corticosteroids; late-preterm; early term; caesarean delivery; RDS
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Htun, Z.T.; Hairston, J.C.; Gyamfi-Bannerman, C.; Marasch, J.; Duarte Ribeiro, A.P. Antenatal Corticosteroids: Extending the Practice for Late-Preterm and Scheduled Early-Term Deliveries? Children 2021, 8, 272. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8040272

AMA Style

Htun ZT, Hairston JC, Gyamfi-Bannerman C, Marasch J, Duarte Ribeiro AP. Antenatal Corticosteroids: Extending the Practice for Late-Preterm and Scheduled Early-Term Deliveries? Children. 2021; 8(4):272. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8040272

Chicago/Turabian Style

Htun, Zeyar T., Jacqueline C. Hairston, Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman, Jaime Marasch, and Ana P. Duarte Ribeiro 2021. "Antenatal Corticosteroids: Extending the Practice for Late-Preterm and Scheduled Early-Term Deliveries?" Children 8, no. 4: 272. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8040272

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop