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Article

A Retrospective Analysis of Feeding Practices and Complications in Patients with Critical Bronchiolitis on Non-Invasive Respiratory Support

1
Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68114, USA
2
Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE 68010, USA
3
Department of Neuroscience, The University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6001 Dodge St, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
4
Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mara Leimanis Laurens
Received: 27 March 2021 / Revised: 13 May 2021 / Accepted: 15 May 2021 / Published: 18 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pediatric Critical Care)
Limited data exist regarding feeding pediatric patients managed on non-invasive respiratory support (NRS) modes that augment oxygenation and ventilation in the setting of acute respiratory failure. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to explore the safety of feeding patients managed on NRS with acute respiratory failure secondary to bronchiolitis. Children up to two years old with critical bronchiolitis managed on continuous positive airway pressure, bilevel positive airway pressure, or RAM cannula were included. Of the 178 eligible patients, 64 were reportedly nil per os (NPO), while 114 received enteral nutrition (EN). Overall equivalent in severity of illness, younger patients populated the EN group, while the NPO group experienced a higher incidence of intubation. Duration of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit and non-invasive respiratory support were shorter in the NPO group, though intubation eliminated the former difference. Within the EN group, ninety percent had feeds initiated within 48 h and 94% reached full feeds within 7 days of NRS initiation, with an 8% complication and <1% aspiration rate. Reported complications did not result in escalation of respiratory support. Notably, a significant improvement in heart rate and respiratory rate was noted after feeds initiation. Taken together, our study supports the practice of early enteral nutrition in patients with critical bronchiolitis requiring NRS. View Full-Text
Keywords: acute respiratory failure; critical bronchiolitis; non-invasive respiratory support; early enteral nutrition acute respiratory failure; critical bronchiolitis; non-invasive respiratory support; early enteral nutrition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lenihan, A.; Ramos, V.; Nemec, N.; Lukowski, J.; Lee, J.; Kendall, K.M.; Mahapatra, S. A Retrospective Analysis of Feeding Practices and Complications in Patients with Critical Bronchiolitis on Non-Invasive Respiratory Support. Children 2021, 8, 410. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8050410

AMA Style

Lenihan A, Ramos V, Nemec N, Lukowski J, Lee J, Kendall KM, Mahapatra S. A Retrospective Analysis of Feeding Practices and Complications in Patients with Critical Bronchiolitis on Non-Invasive Respiratory Support. Children. 2021; 8(5):410. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8050410

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lenihan, Ariann, Vannessa Ramos, Nichole Nemec, Joseph Lukowski, Junghyae Lee, K M. Kendall, and Sidharth Mahapatra. 2021. "A Retrospective Analysis of Feeding Practices and Complications in Patients with Critical Bronchiolitis on Non-Invasive Respiratory Support" Children 8, no. 5: 410. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/children8050410

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